Annotated Bibliography

The SIRC Bibliography offers annotations of publications related to simulation topics. These useful descriptions can help guide faculty who are looking for quality sources to investigate further. Now you can search by category as well.

Individuals are invited to submit articles/resources for inclusion by filling out this form. 


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Author(s):

 Cant, R, P. & Cooper S. J.

Year:

 2009

Article Name:

 Simulation-based Learning in Nursing Education: Systematic Review

Publication:

 Journal of Advanced Nursing 66(1), 3-15

Annotation:

 

The authors, faculty at the School of Nursing and Midwifery at Monash University, Churchill, Victoria, Australia, reviewed the quantitative research comparing medium to high fidelity simulation using manikins with other educational strategies in nursing education. Of 2019 studies reviewed the authors only found 12 that meet the criteria. According to the authors all 12 studies reported statistical improvements in the areas of critical thinking, confidence and/orknowledge/skills after participating in the simulation, however, only six of the studies showed additional gains in these areas when compared to other teaching strategies. The review was well researched with very specific criteria for inclusion. The limited number of studies that met the criteria demonstrates the need for more quantitative studies comparing medium to high fidelity simulation using manikins with other educational strategies in nursing education.

Annotated By:

 Melody Bethards, RN, MSN, CNE

Category:

 Review Articles

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Author(s):

 Harder, N. B.

Year:

 2010

Article Name:

 Use of simulation in teaching and learning in health sciences: A systematic review.

Publication:

 Journal of Nursing Education 49(1), 23-28

Annotation:

 

The author, coordinator learning laboratories and faculty of nursing at University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada reviewed the healthcare literature published between 2003 and 2007 for articles on the effectiveness of simulation as a teaching tool. Directed towards healthcare educators, the author used very specific inclusion and exclusion criteria leaving 23 articles that met the criteria. According to the author’s research, the studies provided evidence that the use of simulation increased students’ clinical skills. The author noted that an unexpected discovery of the review was the fact that nursing studies included both quantitative and qualitative research whereas studies in medicine explored only the quantitative aspect. The review was well researched with very specific criteria for inclusion and exclusion. Even though the review only included studies between 2003 and 2007, it provides a very thorough review of the available studies at the time.

Annotated By:

 Melody Bethards, RN, MSN, CNE

Category:

 Review Articles

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Author(s):

 Kaakinen, J. & Arwood, E.

Year:

 2009

Article Name:

 Systematic Review of Nursing Simulation Literature for Use of Learning Theory

Publication:

 International Journal of Nursing Education Scholarship, 6 (1), DOI: 10.2202/1548-923X.1688

Annotation:

 

Kaakinen & Arwood faculty from The University of Portland in Oregan, provide a systematic review of 120 simulation articles to determine how learning theory was utilized in design and evaluation of learning which occurs during simulation experiences. The authors conclude that the majority of simulations are based on a teaching versus a learning paradigm. Recommendations are made for a shift towards using foundational learning theory for simulation experiences and examples of pairing simulation with learning theory are presented. This article is intended for Nurse Faculty and Faculty using simulation as a teaching strategy.

Annotated By:

 Celeste M. Alfes, DNP, RN

Category:

 

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Author(s):

 Kardong-Edgren, S.; Adamson, K.;Fitzgerald,C.

Year:

 2010

Article Name:

 A Review of Currently Published Evaluation Instruments for Human Patient Simulation

Publication:

 Clinical Simulation in Nursing, 6, e25-e35.

Annotation:

 

Kardong-Edgren, Adamson, and Fitzgerald, nurse faculty from Washington State University, provide a review of currently published evaluation instruments for human patient simulation and learning. The authors summarize and evaluate 29 current simulation evaluation tools. The tools are then divided into the categories: cognitive, psychomotor, affective, group evaluation, and developmental. The authors conclude few nurse faculty are skilled in instrument development and over 1/2 of the studies did not measure or report reliability and validity. Faculty are encouraged to reuse current instruments and participate in multi-site studies to provide the valid data needed to move simulation science forward. This article is intended for Nurse Faculty and Advanced Practice Nurses evaluating simulation as a learning method.

Annotated By:

 Celeste M. Alfes, DNP, RN

Category:

 

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Author(s):

 Ost, D., DeRosiers, A., Britt, J., Fein, A., Lesser, M. & Mehta, A.

Year:

 2001

Article Name:

 Assessment of a bronchoscopy simulator.

Publication:

 American Journal of Respiratory Critical Care Medicine, 164, 2248-2255.

Annotation:

 

The authors, physicians and medical educators from major medical schools or hospitals in New York, Maryland and Ohio, reported on a multi-center prospective cohort study performed using a bronchoscopy simulator to train and evaluate first year pulmonary fellows at 3 different hospitals. The first part of the study was observational to test whether the simulator would be able to distinguish between novices and experts with bronchoscopy (n = 28) based on several measures of performance. The second portion of the study was a small (n = 6) randomized-controlled trial to determine whether simulation training for new pulmonary fellows would be better than conventional bronchoscopy training. The authors described in detail the methods used for the study and presented descriptive statistics as well as comparative statistics to support their conclusions. Results supported that the simulator could differentiate between expert and novice practitioners and that novices trained using the simulator performed significantly better than those trained using conventional methods. The authors discussed limitations of the study and benefits/uses of simulators in training pulmonary physicians. Provided clear support for the use of the simulator in learning bronchoscopy and a clear model for further research in simulator use.

Annotated By:

 Carol S. Coose, EdD, RN, CNE

Category:

 Learning Outcomes

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