Directory of Researchers

If you are interested in having your credentials listed under our Directory of Researchers, please fill out this form. Contact information should be work-related. All submissions are reviewed prior to posting. Please allow 3-5 business days.  

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Name:

Andrea Dodge Ackermann, PhD, RN, CCRN

Education:

Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, PA, 2007, PhD Nursing
Sage Graduate School, Troy, NY, 1999, MS Nursing
Fitchburg State College, Fitchburg, MA, 1975, BS Sciences
North Shore CC, Beverly, MA, 1985, ADN Nursing

Current Employer/Affiliation:

Associate Professor of Nursing
Mount Saint Mary College
330 Powell Ave
Newburgh, NY 12550

Contact Information:

mailto:ackerman@msmc.edu
(845) 569-3143

Published Research:

Acquisition and Retention of CPR Knowledge and Skills for Junior Level Baccalaureate Students. Unpublished Dissertation. Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, PA.

Current Research Interests:

I am currently working on two areas of research related to high fidelity simulation:

Use of simulation during NCLEX preparation for new graduates from a baccalaureate program.

Simulation environment/fidelity and student satisfaction.

Type of Simulation:

Patient Simulators

Teacher Centered:

Roles
Effectiveness

Student Centered:

Roles in Simulation
Learning styles

Educational Practices:

Active Learning
Collaboration
Feedback
Diverse Learning
Time on Task

Design Characteristics:

Fidelity
Debriefing/Guided Reflection

Outcomes:

Critical Thinking
Clinical Judgment

More

Name:

Clare Lamontagne MS, RN, CNE

Education:

University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA, Completing course for PhD Nursing 2008

University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, 1987, MS Nursing

American International College, Springfield, MA, BSN

Springfield Technical Community College, Springfield, MA, ADN

Current Employer/Affiliation:

Professor of Nursing

Springfield Technical Community College

One Armory Square

Springfield, MA 01102-9000

Contact Information:

Lamontagne@stcc.edu

413-755-4853

Published Research:

(2008). "What do we do now that we have SimMan out of the box?" Using a template to develop simulation scenarios. Clinical Simulation in Nursing, 4(1)

Current Research Interests:

I am currently working on a  study of the effects of intimidation on error recovery in a simulated setting.

Type of Simulation:

Patient Simulators
Computer-based

Teacher Centered:

Effectiveness

Student Centered:

Learning styles

Educational Practices:

Active Learning
Collaboration
Feedback

Design Characteristics:

Fidelity
Debriefing/Guided Reflection

Outcomes:

Clinical Judgment
Self Confidence

More

Name:

Suzie Kardong-Edgren PhD, RN

Education:

Texas Woman’s University Denton, TX, PhD, Health Studies, 2004

University of Northern Colorado, Greeley, CO, Certificate in Transcultural Nursing, 2002

Texas Woman’s University, Dallas, TX, MS in Nursing, 1993

University of Nevada, Reno, NV, BSN, 1976

Current Employer/Affiliation:

Washington State University, College of Nursing, Spokane, WA

Assistant Professor of Nursing

Contact Information:

Washington State University

College of Nursing, # 335

Spokane, WA, 99210-1495

509-324-7267

sedgren@wsu.edu

Published Research:

Bray, B., Schwartz, C., Weeks, D., Kardong-Edgren, S. (2009). Human patient simulation technology: Perceptions from a multidisciplinary sample of health care professionals. Clinical Simulation in Nursing. In press.

Kardong-Edgren, S., Adamson, K.A. (March, 2009). BSN medical-surgical student ability to perform CPR in a simulation: Results and implications. Clinical Simulation in Nursing, 5(2). DOI:10.1016/j.ecns.2009.01.006.

Kardong-Edgren, S., Lungstrom, N., & Bendel, R. (2009). VitalSim® vs. SimMan®: A comparison of BSN student test scores, knowledge retention, and satisfaction. Clinical Simulation in Nursing, In press.

Mancini, M., Cazzell, M., Kardong-Edgren, S., Cason, C. (2009). Improving survival from sudden cardiac arrest: A new tool for education. Journal of Occupational Health. In press.

Cason, C., Kardong-Edgren, S., Behan, B., Mancini, M. (2009). Innovation in basic life support education for healthcare providers: Improving competence in CPR through self-directed learning. Journal of Staff Development. In press.

Kardong-Edgren, S., Starkweather, A., Ward, L. (2008). The integration of simulation into a clinical foundations of nursing course: Student and faculty perspectives. International Journal of Nursing Education Scholarship. 5(1), Article 26. Available at: http://www.bepress.com/ijnes/vol5/iss1/art26

Kardong-Edgren, S., Anderson, M., Michael, J. (2007). Does simulation fidelity improve student test scores? Clinical Simulation in Nursing Education. 3(1). Available from www.INACSL.org.

Current Research Interests:

I am currently the national project director for four research studies for the American Heart Association, Laerdal, Medical Corporation, the National League for Nursing, and American Medical Response Corporation. The studies center on new methods to increase the learning and retention of CPR and ACLS knowledge and skills over time.

I am the co-director of  a year HRSA ITNEP grant, with Dr. Brenda Zierler of the Univ. of Washington. This 5-year grant provides education for nurses in the use of technology including simulation in 5 western states (Washington, Wyoming, Alaska, Montana, and Idaho). 

WIth doctoral student help, we are finishing a 2 year study on a modified Lasater clinical judgment tool, based on Tanner's clinical judgment model.

Type of Simulation:

Patient Simulators
Standardized Patients

Teacher Centered:

Student Centered:

# students involved in simulation

Educational Practices:

Active Learning
Feedback
Time on Task

Design Characteristics:

Fidelity

Outcomes:

Clinical Judgment
Other

More

Name:

Paula E. Glass, ARNP, MSN, EdD(c)

Education:

B.S.N. awarded 1981 from State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, N.Y.

M.S.N. awarded 2004 from Florida International University, Miami, Florida

EdD(c) expected completion 2011 from Nova Southeastern University, Ft. Lauderdale, Fl.

Current Employer/Affiliation:

Palm Beach Community College - RN Program

Lake Worth, Florida

Contact Information:

glassp@pbcc.edu

Published Research:

Current Research Interests:

Currently proposing study that focuses on debriefing and the hope of discovering best-practices for best learning outcomes. Sample research questions: Which activities work best for certain types of scenarios? Which debriefing activities do students perceive to be the most helpful in achieving designed learning outcomes?

Type of Simulation:

Patient Simulators
Other

Teacher Centered:

Roles
Effectiveness
Other

Student Centered:

Educational Practices:

Active Learning
Feedback
Student-Faculty Interaction
Diverse Learning

Design Characteristics:

Fidelity
Debriefing/Guided Reflection
Other

Outcomes:

Self Confidence
Other

More

Name:

Dr Maura C Schlairet

Education:

EdD, MSN, RN, CNL

Current Employer/Affiliation:

Valdosta State University, College of Nursing

Contact Information:

1500 North Patterson St.
Valdosta, GA 31698
229-333-7192
mcschlai@valdosta.edu

Published Research:

Schlairet, M. C. (in press). Needs of older cancer survivors in a community cancer care setting. Journal of Gerontological Nursing.

Schlairet, M. C. (in press). Efficacy of podcasting: Utilization in undergraduate and graduate programs in a college of nursing. Journal of Nursing Education.

Schlairet, M. C., Heddon, M. A., & Griffis, M. (in press). Clinical and academic partnership: Needs assessment to guide development of a survivorship program for a community cancer center. Oncology Nursing Forum.

Schlairet, M. C., & Pollock, J. W. (2010). Equivalence testing of traditional and simulated clinical experience: Undergraduate nursing students’ knowledge acquisition. The Journal of Nursing Education, 49(1), 43-47.

Schlairet, M. C. (2010). Cancer survivorship: Needs and distress among older adults in a community cancer care setting. 16th International Conference on Cancer Nursing (ICCN). Published proceedings: Final program and abstracts, 129.

Schlairet, M. C. (2009). End of life care education: Statewide survey of nurses’ educational needs and effects of education. The Journal of Professional Nursing, 25(3), 170-177.

Schlairet, M. C. (2009). Bioethics mediation: The role and importance of nursing advocacy. Nursing Outlook, 57(4), 185-193.

Schlairet, M. C., Heddon, M. A., & Griffis, M. (2009). Survivorship program development: Needs assessment in community cancer centers utilizing academic partnerships (Abstract). Oncology Nursing Forum, 36(1), XIII.

Schlairet, M. C. & Pollock, J. W. (2008). Simulated clinical experiences: Baccalaureate students’ acquisition of knowledge. [Abstract]. Professions Education Researcher Quarterly, 29(9), 17.

Schlairet, M. C. (2007). Zero-tolerance for horizontal violence in nursing: Transforming the culture in Georgia. Georgia Nursing, 67(4), 5-6.

Schlairet, M. C. (2007). Challenges to come: Building nursing care capacity for older adults in Georgia. Georgia Nursing, 67(4), 7-8.

Schlairet, M. C. (2007). Caring for the dying: State wide survey of nurses’ educational needs. [Abstract]. Professions Education Researcher Quarterly, 28(2), 24.

Schlairet, M. C. (2006). Survey of nurses’ educational needs related to end of life care. Dissertation Abstracts International, (UMI No. 0819412).

Schlairet, M. C. (2006). Georgia nurses and end of life care: Results of a state-wide survey. Georgia Nursing, 66(4), p. 23-24.

Schlairet, M. C. (2006). End of life nursing care: A survey of nurses’ educational needs [Abstract]. Proceedings of the Sigma Theta Tau 17th International Nursing Research Congress Focusing on Evidence-Based Practice. Advancing knowledge, community and evidence-based nursing globally through collaboration. Montreal, Canada: Honor Society of Nursing, Sigma Theta Tau International.

Schlairet, M. C. (2005). Improving end of life nursing care: Statewide educational needs survey. Georgia Nursing, 65(2), p. 8-10.

Schlairet, M. C. (2005). At the end: One chance to get it right. Portico, 1(1), p. 16.

Current Research Interests:

Effect of sequencing simulated and direct care experiences on critical thinking abilities in undergraduate BSN students.

Type of Simulation:

Patient Simulators

Teacher Centered:

Effectiveness

Student Centered:

Other

Educational Practices:

Active Learning
High Expectations
Feedback
Student-Faculty Interaction
Diverse Learning
Time on Task

Design Characteristics:

Duration of Simulation

Outcomes:

Critical Thinking
Clinical Judgment
Self Confidence
Other

More

Name:

Marian Luctkar-Flude, RN, BScN, MScN, PhD (student)

Education:

Queen's University, Kingston ON, Canada, 2010 beginning PhD studies in Rehabilitation Science

University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada, 2007, MScN

St. Lawrence College, Kingston ON, Canada, 2000, Critical Care Nursing Diploma

University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada 1986, BScN

Current Employer/Affiliation:

Adjunct Professor, Nursing Lab Coordinator
Queen's University, School of Nursing
92 Barrie Street, Kingston ON, Canada, K7L3N6

Contact Information:

mfl1@queensu.ca

613-533-6000, Ext. 77383

Published Research:

Luctkar-Flude, M., Pulling, C., & Larocque, M. (in press). Ending infusion confusion: Evaluating a virtual intravenous pump educational module. Clinical Simulation in Nursing.

Current Research Interests:

I was the coordinator for a large interprofessional simulation research project:

      Enhancing patient welfare: Interprofessional health education through patient simulation.   (2007-2010).

I was the principal investigator for several small research projects involving simulation:

     Evaluating human patient simulators and standardized patients in an undergraduate nursing health assessment course (2008-2009);

     Evaluating a virtual intravenous pump educational module for undergraduate nursing students (2008-2009);

     Evaluating patient simulation facilitation and debriefing methods in an undergraduate nursing health assessment course (2009-2010);

     Evaluating a virtual intravenous pump educational module for undergraduate nursing students: Phase two(2009-2010).

I have received funding for another small research project:

     Critical assessment and interventions for the unresponsive patient: Introduction of a high-fidelity simulation module into an undergraduate nursing health assessment course (2010-2011).

 

Type of Simulation:

Patient Simulators
Computer-based
Standardized Patients

Teacher Centered:

Effectiveness

Student Centered:

Roles in Simulation
Other

Educational Practices:

Active Learning
Collaboration
Feedback

Design Characteristics:

Debriefing/Guided Reflection
Cueing

Outcomes:

Clinical Judgment
Self Confidence
Other

More

Name:

Mary Ann Cantrell, PhD, RN

Education:

Current Employer/Affiliation:

Villanova University, College of Nursing

Contact Information:

Mary Ann Cantrell, PhD, RN                  
Associate Professor
College of Nursing, 342 Driscoll Hall
Villanova University
610-519-6829
610-519-7650 (fax)

Published Research:

Cantrell, M.A. (2008). The Importance of Debriefing in Clinical Simulations. Clinical Simulation in Nursing Education, 4, e19-e23.

Cantrell, M.A., Meakim, C., & Cash, K. (2008). Students’ Perceived Efficacy of Pediatric-Based Clinical Simulations. Clinical Simulation in Nursing Education, 4(1). (on-line journal)

Current Research Interests:

Debriefing in Simulated Learning Experiences

Type of Simulation:

Patient Simulators

Teacher Centered:

Roles
Responsibilities
Effectiveness

Student Centered:

Roles in Simulation
Learning styles

Educational Practices:

Feedback
Student-Faculty Interaction

Design Characteristics:

Debriefing/Guided Reflection
Student Prep Prior to Simulation

Outcomes:

Critical Thinking
Clinical Judgment

More

Name:

Barbara Sittner

Education:

University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE, PhD, Human Resource & Family Science, 2002

University of Nebraska Medical Center College of Nursing, Omaha, NE, MSN, 2004

University of Nebraska Medical Center College of Nursing, Omaha, NE, BSN, 1994

Bryan Memorial School of Nursing, Lincoln, NE, RN, 1978

Current Employer/Affiliation:

University of Nebraska Medical Center College of Nursing, Omaha, NE, Assistant Professor

Contact Information:

bsittner@unmc.edu

Published Research:

Sittner, B ., Schmaderer, M., Zimmerman, L., Hertzog, M. & George, B. (2009). Rapid response team: Simulated training for enhancing patient safety (STEPS). Clinical Simulation in Nursing, 5 (3),e119 – e127.

Palmer, D.G. Sittner, B., J., & Bakewell-Sachs, S. (2009). Complex clinical case studies in perinatal and neonatal care. Journal of Perinatal & Neonatal Nursing 23 (2), 101.

Sittner, B., Hudson, D., & DeFrain (2007). Using the concept of family strengths to enhance nursing care. The American Journal of Maternal Child Nursing (MCN), 32(6), 353 – 357.

Schoening, A., Sittner, B., & Todd, M. (2006). Simulated clinical experience: nursing students’ perceptions and the educators’ role. Nurse Educator, 31(6), 253 – 258.

Sittner, B. (2006). Media Review: A Doula Story. Journal of Perinatal & Neonatal Nursing, 24 (4), 349.

Sittner, B., DeFrain, J., & Hudson, D. (2005). Effects of high-risk pregnancies on families. The American Journal of Maternal Child Nursing (MCN), 30(2), 121 – 126.

Sittner, B., Hudson, D.B., Grossman, C.C., & Gaston-Johansson, F. (1998). Adolescents’ perception of pain during labor. Clinical Nursing Research 7(1), 82 – 93.

Current Research Interests:

My interests include promoting safety through simulation and evaluating outcomes following simulation training.

Type of Simulation:

Patient Simulators

Teacher Centered:

Roles
Responsibilities
Effectiveness

Student Centered:

Roles in Simulation
Learning styles

Educational Practices:

Active Learning
Feedback
Student-Faculty Interaction
Diverse Learning

Design Characteristics:

Fidelity
Debriefing/Guided Reflection
Cueing
Student Prep Prior to Simulation
Duration of Simulation

Outcomes:

Critical Thinking
Clinical Judgment
Self Confidence

More

Name:

Deborah Garbee PhD, APRN, BC

Education:

University of New Orleans, PhD, 2006

Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, MN, 1998

Loyola University, BSN, 1988

Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, ASN, 1975

Current Employer/Affiliation:

Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center

School of Nursing

1900 Gravier Street

New Orleans, LA 70112

Contact Information:

504-568-4183
dgarbe@lsuhsc.edu

Published Research:

Current Research Interests:

High-Fidelity Human Patient Simulation
Teamwork and Communication
Translation of Team-based behaviors

Type of Simulation:

Patient Simulators
Computer-based

Teacher Centered:

Student Centered:

Roles in Simulation

Educational Practices:

Active Learning
High Expectations
Collaboration
Feedback
Student-Faculty Interaction

Design Characteristics:

Fidelity
Debriefing/Guided Reflection

Outcomes:

Critical Thinking
Other

More

Name:

Beth Haas

Education:

Doctor of Philosophy (anticipated 2013)
Saint Louis University

Master of Public Health in Community Health (2006)
Saint Louis University

Bachelor of Science in Health Sciences (2004)

Minors in Biology and Business Administration
Truman State University

Current Employer/Affiliation:

Director for Clinical Simulation Institute
Goldfarb School of Nursing at Barnes-Jewish College
BJC Healthcare
Saint Louis, MO

Contact Information:

BHaas@bjc.org

Published Research:

Dreisinger, M., Leet, T., Baker, Gillespie, K., B., Haas & Brownson, R. Improving the Public Health Workforce: Evaluation of a Training Course to Enhance Evidence-Based Decision Making. Journal of Public Health Management and Practice. 2008; 14(2): 138-143.

Haas, B., Seckman, C., & Rea, G. Incorporating Cultural Diversity and Caring through Simulation in a Baccalaureate Nursing Program. International Journal of Human Caring. 2010; 14(2): 50-51.

Current Research Interests:

Mastery learning of safe intravenous medication delivery by baccalaureate nursing students using simulation and deliberate practice, Inter-professional communication between nursing and medical students and implications on plan of care and patient safety, and Incorporating cultural diversity and caring through simulation in a baccalaureate nursing program

Type of Simulation:

Patient Simulators
Haptic devices
Standardized Patients

Teacher Centered:

Roles
Responsibilities
Effectiveness

Student Centered:

Roles in Simulation
Learning styles

Educational Practices:

Active Learning
Collaboration
Feedback
Diverse Learning

Design Characteristics:

Fidelity
Debriefing/Guided Reflection
Student Prep Prior to Simulation

Outcomes:

Critical Thinking
Clinical Judgment
Self Confidence

More

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Education:
Current Employer/Affiliation:
Contact Information:
Published Research:
Current Research Interests:
Type of Simulation:
Teacher Centered:
Student Centered:
Educational Practices:
Design Characteristics:
Outcomes:
Author first name:
Author surname: