Annotated Bibliography

The SIRC Bibliography offers annotations of publications related to simulation topics. These useful descriptions can help guide faculty who are looking for quality sources to investigate further. Now you can search by category as well.

Individuals are invited to submit articles/resources for inclusion by filling out this form. 


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Author(s):

 Pauly-O’Neill, S.

Year:

 2009

Article Name:

 Beyond the five rights: Improving patient safety in pediatric medication administration through simulation.

Publication:

 Clinical Simulation in Nursing, 5, e181-e186.

Annotation:

 

As a pediatric nurse practitioner, Pauly-O’Neill has first-hand experience with the inherent challenges unique to pediatric medication administration. These challenges include the five rights as well as other considerations such as allergy status or knowledge of medication therapeutic action and adverse effects. Simulation can provide a safe setting in which nursing students can improve their medication administration knowledge and skill. Pauly-O’Neill collected pre- and post-intervention data through direct observation and an exam. The intervention consisted of “pediatric case scenarios that included high-risk drugs and built-in prescribing error†(p. 185).  After the intervention, students improved in their ability to administer pediatric medications safely and effectively.    

Annotated By:

 Cecily A. Montgomery, RN, BSN

Category:

 Curriculum Integration
Learning Outcomes

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Author(s):

 Paige, J. B. & Daley, B. J.

Year:

 2009

Article Name:

 Situated cognition: A learning framework to support and guide high-fidelity simulation.

Publication:

 Clinical Simulation in Nursing, 5, e97-e103.

Annotation:

 

Paige and Daley assert that it is important to use a learning framework well suited to a particular learning activity, specifically, simulation. They provide an overview of experiential learning, outline the origins of situated cognition, show how situated cognition can be applied to a high-fidelity simulation (HFS), and make recommendations for future research. A key feature of situated cognition is that “thinking and learning as measures of knowledge make sense only within particular situations†(p. 99). This is why it is so right for HFS because HFS allows learning to occur in an environment that is as close to the real thing as possible.

Annotated By:

 Cecily A. Montgomery, RN, BSN

Category:

 Faculty Development

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Author(s):

 Morrison, B., Scarcello, M., Thibeault, L., & Walker, D.

Year:

 2009

Article Name:

 The use of a simulated nursing practice lab in a distance practical nursing program.

Publication:

 Clinical Simulation in Nursing, 5, e67-e71.

Annotation:

 

These authors, with Health and Community Services of Confederation College, explore a unique use of simulation in distance learning. While there is much information about the use of distance education for teaching theory, little is available regarding teaching clinical techniques via distance education. The high-fidelity simulation (HFS) experienced by practical nursing students provided them with a learning opportunity that would not otherwise be available to them due to distance. The study, using qualitative and quantitative methods, revealed that the HFS “resulted in increased knowledge†(p. 70). Three themes that emerged were connecting with classmates, limited time, and simulation benefits. Within the theme of simulation benefits were subthemes such as confidence and “application of theory to practice†(p. 69).

Annotated By:

 Cecily A. Montgomery, RN, BSN

Category:

 Learning Outcomes

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Author(s):

 Lucas, L.

Year:

 2010

Article Name:

 Partnering to enhance the nursing curriculum: Electronic medical record accessibility.

Publication:

 Clinical Simulation in Nursing, 6, e97-e102.

Annotation:

 

New technology requires new teaching strategies. Lucas, of the University of Saint Francis (USF), describes the implementation of EMR simulation for senior nursing students. A partnership between USF and the local healthcare provider afforded free access to a training EMR. As one of several learning activities, students participated in a high-fidelity simulation in which they practiced medication administration using the training EMR. After the EMR simulation experiences, students, instructors, and staff nurses noticed an improvement in students’ ability to use the EMR during clinical practicum. A major benefit of including EMR simulation in nursing curricula “may allow the new graduate nurse more time to expand other skills, such as critical thinking and prioritization†(p. 101).

Annotated By:

 Cecily A. Montgomery, RN, BSN

Category:

 Learning Outcomes
Teaching Modalities

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Author(s):

 Leighton, K.

Year:

 2009

Article Name:

 Death of a simulator.

Publication:

 Clinical Simulation in Nursing, 5, e59-e62.

Annotation:

 

Leighton, of BryanLGH College of Health Sciences, “describe[s] three types of simulated patient death experiences, explore[s] concerns and considerations related to simulated patient death,†and discusses the challenges of planning for simulated patient death (p. 59). With a scarcity of literature on this topic, Leighton instead reviewed research related to nurses’ perceived lack of education on end-of-life care. She defines the three types of simulated death as 1) expected, 2) unexpected, and 3) “death as a result of action or inaction†(p. 60). One major area of discussion is whether to allow simulator death or not. Considerations for both sides are presented. Key interventions to mitigate the potential negative psychological impact are prebriefing and debriefing.  

Annotated By:

 Cecily A. Montgomery, RN, BSN

Category:

 Review Articles
Specialties

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Author(s):

 Leighton, K. & Scholl, K.

Year:

 2009

Article Name:

 Simulated codes: Understanding the response of undergraduate nursing students.

Publication:

 Clinical Simulation in Nursing, 5, e187-e194.

Annotation:

 

Leighton & Scholl, of BryanLGH College of Health Sciences, conducted a study of undergraduate nursing students to discover what prevents them from successfully using basic life support (BLS) principles and how well they apply them. Using the Nursing Education Simulation Framework they utilized qualitative and quantitative data collection methods such as a questionnaire about confidence, fear, and past experience with cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR); direct observation of a simulated code; and debriefing. They found that, in most cases, students started CPR in less than three minutes; however, most did not perform BLS correctly. Qualitative themes discovered were: future, managing the code, simulation versus reality, lack of knowledge, and person feelings.

Annotated By:

 Cecily A. Montgomery, RN, BSN

Category:

 Learning Outcomes

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Author(s):

 Leighton, K. & Dubas, J.

Year:

 2009

Article Name:

 Simulated death: An innovative approach to teaching end-of-life care.

Publication:

 Clinical Simulation in Nursing, 5, e223-e230.

Annotation:

 

Leighton & Dubas, of BryanLGH College of Health Sciences, present the results of a four semester qualitative study involving undergraduate nursing students in a 1-credit semester course entitled Caring in Times of Death, Dying, and Bereavement. In addition to didactic teaching methods, high-fidelity human patient simulation was used to simulate a patient death. The researchers discovered three main themes from students’ answers to the debriefing and evaluation questions that followed the simulation: Impact of family presence, value of realism (fidelity), and self-efficacy. Students had mixed responses to the presence of “family†in the simulation; some liked it and others felt helpless. However, the students found that the simulation enabled them to synthesize what they learned through lecture. Finally, this simulation was challenging to students even though they had the necessary knowledge with which to care for the patient.      

Annotated By:

 Cecily A. Montgomery, RN, BSN

Category:

 Specialties

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Author(s):

 Lambton, J. & Prion, S.

Year:

 2009

Article Name:

 The value of simulation in the development of observational skills for clinical microsystems.

Publication:

 Clinical Simulation in Nursing, 5, e137-e143.

Annotation:

 

Lambton & Prion, of the University of San Francisco School of Nursing, ask an intriguing question: “Can observing students engaged in a simulation teach other students to recognize the same characteristics seen in a complex microsystem?†(p. 137). They report on the results of an assignment given to students in the clinical nurse leader (CNL) graduate program. After reading an article describing clinical microsystems, CNL students observed two simulation scenarios in which baccalaureate nursing students cared for pediatric patients. The researchers gathered qualitative data from a transcript of their debriefing with the CNL students and the CNL students’ completed observational tool. Three main themes arose during the debriefing: clarification of the CNL role, their own practice, and the value of simulation. They concluded that observing a simulation can provide a rich learning experience.     

Annotated By:

 Cecily A. Montgomery, RN, BSN

Category:

 Learning Outcomes

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Author(s):

 Kardong-Edgren, S., Lungstrom, N., & Bendel, R.

Year:

 2009

Article Name:

 VitalSim® versus SimMan®: A comparison of BSN student test scores, knowledge retention, and satisfaction.

Publication:

 Clinical Simulation in Nursing, 5, e105-e111.

Annotation:

 

Since the cost of manikins with different degrees of fidelity can vary greatly, it is important to discover whether the degree of fidelity has an effect on students. Kardong-Edgren, Lungstrom, and Bendel, of Washington State University, examined how test scores, knowledge retention, and satisfaction were influenced by VitalSim®, a medium-fidelity manikin, or SimMan®, a high-fidelity manikin, compared to a control group. They found that test scores were not affected by participation in the simulation, regardless of the simulator type and that “there was no statistically significant difference in satisfaction by simulator type†(p. 108). However, the researchers cite several limitations and confounding factors including compensatory rivalry, that this was the students’ first experience with simulation, and that paper-and pencil exams may not be the best evaluation of the impact of simulation.

Annotated By:

 Cecily A. Montgomery, RN, BSN

Category:

 Learning Outcomes

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Author(s):

 Kardong-Edgren, S., Adamson, K. A., & Fitzgerald, C.

Year:

 2010

Article Name:

 A review of currently published evaluation instruments for human patient simulation.

Publication:

 Clinical Simulation in Nursing, 6, e25-e35.

Annotation:

 

Kardong-Edgren and Adamson, of Washington State University, provide a summary and evaluation of recently published human patient simulation (HPS) evaluation tools. The tools are organized into the following categories: cognitive, psychomotor, affective, and group evaluation; and tools in development. Many of the articles reviewed did not include psychometric statistics. Therefore, the authors exhort HPS evaluators to use existing tools to conduct assessments so that validity and reliability can be determined for untested instruments. Also included are discussions of “the importance of learning domains in simulation,†the challenges of instrument development, and the concepts of validity and reliability (p. 25).

Annotated By:

 Cecily A. Montgomery, RN, BSN

Category:

 Review Articles

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