Annotated Bibliography

The SIRC Bibliography offers annotations of publications related to simulation topics. These useful descriptions can help guide faculty who are looking for quality sources to investigate further. Now you can search by category as well.

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Author(s):

 Tiffen, J., Graf, N., & Corbridge, S.

Year:

 2009

Article Name:

 Effectiveness of a low-fidelity simulation experience in building confidence among advanced practice nursing graduate students.

Publication:

 Clinical Simulation in Nursing, 5, e113-e117.

Annotation:

 

In order to remedy a lack of evidence for the use of simulation with advanced practice nursing students, Tiffen, Graf, and Corbridge, with the Department of Biobehavioral Health Science at the University of Illinois, examined whether low-fidelity simulation (LFS) can improve confidence in those students. One goal for this study was to ascertain whether simulation is an effective teaching strategy for this population of students. They found that students’ confidence in health assessment skills improved after a LFS experience. These investigators encourage future research not only comparing simulation to more traditional teaching methods, “…but also against newer methods, such as standardized (actor) patients,†as well as in validity testing of evaluation tools (p. 117).

Annotated By:

 Cecily A. Montgomery, RN, BSN

Category:

 Learning Outcomes
Faculty Development

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Author(s):

 Sweeney, L.

Year:

 2009

Article Name:

 Simulation puzzles: An exemplar of simulation program development.

Publication:

 Clinical Simulation in Nursing, 5, e151-e154.

Annotation:

 

Sweeney, a clinical nurse specialist at Dominican University of California, uses an edgeless puzzle with interchangeable pieces as an analogy for the work she did as the first simulation laboratory coordinator and only member of the simulation laboratory staff at a small, private university. The foundation of the program consisted of 1) the expectation of faculty participation, 2) collaborative work between the lab coordinator and faculty, 3) development of quality scenarios, 4) emphasis on debriefing, and 5) time allocated for training and conferences. With a conversational style she describes the six key puzzle pieces of the simulation program: networking and resources, learners receptive to simulation, ongoing faculty and staff development, unusual skill sets, continuous feedback and program revision, but most of all, debriefing.

Annotated By:

 Cecily A. Montgomery, RN, BSN

Category:

 Curriculum Integration
Faculty Development

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Author(s):

 Strouse, A. C.

Year:

 2010

Article Name:

 Multidisciplinary simulation centers: Promoting safe practice.

Publication:

 Clinical Simulation in Nursing, 6, e139-e142.

Annotation:

 

Strouse, a masters prepared nurse affiliated with York Hospital in Pennsylvania, writes a brief history, current status, and future recommendations for multidisciplinary simulation centers. High-fidelity simulation (HFS) exercises focused on improving communication and team work were first used in aviation and eventually found popularity and use in health care. Currently, HFS is widely used in health care education; yet, health care facilities have not adopted it as fully. This is an area recommended for future development, especially because of the improvements such training could make on patient safety and error prevention.   

Annotated By:

 Cecily A. Montgomery, RN, BSN

Category:

 Interprofessional

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Author(s):

 Spade, C. M. & Mulhall, M.

Year:

 2010

Article Name:

 Teaching psychosocial vital signs across the undergraduate nursing curriculum.

Publication:

 Clinical Simulation in Nursing, 6, e143-e151.

Annotation:

 

Psychosocial vital signs (PVS) should be included as part of a regular patient assessment in order to provide holistic patient care. This article discusses how high-fidelity simulation (HFS) can be used with baccalaureate nursing students to promote the therapeutic communication needed to assess PVS. Spade & Mulhall, of Regis University, describe the four components of a PVS assessment: perception, support, coping, and anxiety. Theoretical premises inherent in this perspective include Spade’s five dimensions of human response (cognition, affect, spirit, behavior, and physiology). Also included are discussions of the nurse-patient relationship, situational crisis, and the faculty role in teaching PVS. The authors provide a detailed table of the phases of implementation across the curriculum, PVS assessment tool, and PVS algorithm. 

Annotated By:

 Cecily A. Montgomery, RN, BSN

Category:

 Curriculum Integration

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Author(s):

 Smith, S. J.

Year:

 2009

Article Name:

 Looking for simulation resources? Try SIRC!

Publication:

 Clinical Simulation in Nursing, 5, e195-e197.

Annotation:

 

Smith, a clinical nurse leader at Wright State University College of Nursing and Health, describes and reviews the Simulation Innovation Resource Center, a National League for Nursing online resource. Included in her review are the introduction video, discussion forum, and three of the nine online courses available for a fee. Highlighting the ease of learning from home or office, she outlines course formats and resources of Teaching and Learning Strategies by Deborah Henderson, RN, PhD; Evaluating Simulations, by Dr. Susan Prion; and Guidelines for Simulation Research, by Dr. Suzie Kardong-Edgren.     

Annotated By:

 Cecily A. Montgomery, RN, BSN

Category:

 Review Articles

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Author(s):

 Sittner, B. J., Schmaderer, M., Zimmerman, L., Hertzog, M., & George, B.

Year:

 2009

Article Name:

 Rapid response team simulated training for enhancing patient safety (STEPS).

Publication:

 Clinical Simulation in Nursing, 5, e119-e127.

Annotation:

 

These researchers, affiliated with the University of Nebraska and Saint Elizabeth Regional Medical Center, sought “to assess the impact of Simulated Training for Enhancing Patient Safety on nurses’ RRT knowledge and clinical judgment†(STEPS, rapid response team; p. 120). This training was implemented to prevent failure to rescue, a complication that occurs when health care personnel fail to recognize or act on a patient’s deteriorating condition. Using a pre- and post-test study design, they found that “…nurses were highly satisfied†with their simulation experience and believed that they could apply what they learned to their practice. Limitations of the study and benefits of using simulation were also discussed.

Annotated By:

 Cecily A. Montgomery, RN, BSN

Category:

 Learning Outcomes

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Author(s):

 Robinson-Smith, G., Bradley, P. K., & Meakim, C.

Year:

 2009

Article Name:

 Evaluating the use of standardized patients in undergraduate psychiatric nursing experiences.

Publication:

 Clinical Simulation in Nursing, 5, e203-e211.

Annotation:

 

Using adult learning theory and problem-based learning as a theoretical framework, Robinson-Smith, Bradley, and Meakim, of Villanova University College of Nursing, evaluated student satisfaction, self-confidence, and critical thinking after participation in a psychiatric nursing simulation with a standardized patient (SP). Ultimately, the goal was for nursing students to be able to practice psychiatric nursing assessments, such as suicide risk and mental status exam, within the safety of a simulation so that they would be better prepared for clinical encounters with actual psychiatric clients. The researchers found that most students were satisfied, had improved self-confidence, and enhanced critical thinking with learning through SP simulation. Discussions of the definition of a SP, the use of SPs in nursing education (including recruitment and training), and the forms used to prepare students and SPs for the simulation were included in this article.

Annotated By:

 Cecily A. Montgomery, RN, BSN

Category:

 Learning Outcomes
Faculty Development
Teaching Modalities

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Author(s):

 Richard, J. J.

Year:

 2009

Article Name:

 Beginning experiences with simulation: Asthma in a pediatric patient.

Publication:

 Clinical Simulation in Nursing, 5, e5-e8.

Annotation:

 

Richard, a master’s prepared nurse with University of Saint Francis, shares her journey with preparing a pediatric clinical simulation scenario. The article includes sections on fidelity, roles, planning and preparation, debriefing, evaluation, and lessons learned. Both students and faculty felt the simulation was a positive experience. Based on her evaluation of the simulation scenario, Richard plans to prepare students better, improve the realism by incorporating more actors, and make more time for simulation experiences in the clinical schedule.    

Annotated By:

 Cecily A. Montgomery, RN, BSN

Category:

 Curriculum Integration

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Author(s):

 Reed, S.

Year:

 2010

Article Name:

 Designing a simulation for student evaluation using Scriven’s Key Evaluation Checklist.

Publication:

 Clinical Simulation in Nursing, 6, e41-e44.

Annotation:

 

In this succinct article, Reed, of Brigham Young University College of Nursing, describes how Scriven’s Key Evaluation Checklist (SKEC) can be used in the process of planning and implementing simulation as an evaluation for nursing students. After a short introduction to the features of Scriven’s framework, each section of the checklist is presented and applied. Concepts such as exportability and meta-analysis are briefly defined. Also included is an example of simulation planning featuring postpartum hemorrhage.    

Annotated By:

 Cecily A. Montgomery, RN, BSN

Category:

 Curriculum Integration
Learning Outcomes

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Author(s):

 Reed, C. C., Lancaster, R. R., & Musser, D. B.

Year:

 2009

Article Name:

 Nursing leadership and management simulation: Creating complexity.

Publication:

 Clinical Simulation in Nursing, 5, e17-e21.

Annotation:

 

Clinical experiences that nursing students get little practice with in their clinical settings are leadership and management. Reed, Lancaster, and Musser, of the University of Central Arkansas, share how they provided a complex clinical simulation experience for senior baccalaureate nursing students. The scenario gave them the opportunity to practice advanced skills such as therapeutic communication, collaboration, decision making, and prioritization. The majority of the article is a detailed description of development and implementation of the scenario within Jeffries’ theory as framework.     

Annotated By:

 Cecily A. Montgomery, RN, BSN

Category:

 Curriculum Integration

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