Annotated Bibliography

The SIRC Bibliography offers annotations of publications related to simulation topics. These useful descriptions can help guide faculty who are looking for quality sources to investigate further. Now you can search by category as well.

Individuals are invited to submit articles/resources for inclusion by filling out this form. 


Page: ()   1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  ()
Author(s):

 Sanford, P. G.

Year:

 2010

Article Name:

 Simulation in nursing education: A review of the research

Publication:

 The Qualitative Report, 15(4), 106-1011

Annotation:

 

This article reviews nine articles, which are either qualitative or quantitative research, related to the outcomes of using high-fidelity simulation in nursing education.  The primary outcomes identified in this review include safety, clinical judgment, strengths and weaknesses of simulation, critical thinking through debriefing and reflective journaling, leveling protocols within curriculum, and designing experiences centered around outcomes.  The primary finding of this review is the lack of rigor in qualitative studies noting results reflective of primarily opinion polls.  The other finding included a lack of supporting theory and evidence-based research to support the use of simulation within nursing edcuation.

Annotated By:

 Tracy Chesney, MSN-Ed, RN, CNE

Category:

 Review Articles

More

Author(s):

 Hyland, J. R. & Hawkins, M. C.

Year:

 2009

Article Name:

 High-fidelity human simulation in nursing education: A review of literature and guide for implementation

Publication:

 Teaching & Learning in Nursing, 4, 14-21

Annotation:

 

The authors reviewed a variety of articles related to the implementation of high-fidelity human simulators in nursing laboratories.  This review article did not identify specific criteria related to the articles reviewed.  It reviewed the history of nursing use in both nonnursing careers and nursing education.  The current challenges and application in nursing education was reviewed.  The current state of research in the use of simulation within nursing education, as well as outcomes measured was discussed, including the tools in use to validate the results of this educational methodology.  The recommendation of this review includes a list of guidelines to consider before implementing high-fidelity human simulation as a teaching strategy.

Annotated By:

 Tracy Chesney, MSN-Ed, RN, CNE

Category:

 Review Articles

More

Author(s):

 Brewer, E. P.

Year:

 2011

Article Name:

 Successful techniques for using human patient simulation in nursing education

Publication:

 Journal of Nursing Scholarship, 43(3), 311-317

Annotation:

 

The author reviewed 10 studies published in the last five years focused on the used of simulation in nursing education.  The focus of this review centered around identifying the strategies for the use of human patient simulation in nursing education.  The review addressed the effectiveness of a variety of uses noted for human patient simulation.  The conclusion of this review notes that the use of human patient simulation is positively viewed within nursing education, but there remains a lack of adequate quantitative research validating the value of this teaching strategy in nursing education.

Annotated By:

 Tracy Chesney, MSN-Ed, RN, CNE

Category:

 Review Articles

More

Author(s):

 INASCL Board of Directors

Year:

 2011

Article Name:

 Standards of Best Practice: Simulation

Publication:

 Clinical Simulation in Nursing

Annotation:

 

The International Nursing Association for Clinical Simulation and Learning has published seven standards of best practice for simulation. Definitions for terminology and expectations for participants are provided.Statements about participant objectives, facilitator methods and facilitator criteria are included. Debriefing and expected outcomes complete the list of standards.

Annotated By:

 Janet Willhaus, MSN, RN

Category:

 Curriculum Integration
Faculty Development

More

Author(s):

 Kardong-Edgren, S.; Hanberg, A.D.; Keenan, C.; Ackerman, A.; Chambers, K.

Year:

 2011

Article Name:

 A discussion of high-states testing: An extension of a 2009 INACSL conference roundtable

Publication:

 

Annotation:

 

High Stakes testing is defined as an examination with the potential to fail students at the end of a course or program. In this article, the use of high stakes testing in the form of a simulation experience is debated by members of the International Nursing Association for Clinical Simulation and Learning. Comments are taken from a Listserve discussion from 2009. Nursing currently relies on a single paper-pencil exam to determine readiness of new graduates for licensure. A discussion of the readiness of the profession for a high-stakes simulation examination is discussed. Additionally the difficulties in determining what should be tested and how that will be evaluated receive attention.

Annotated By:

 Janet Willhaus, MSN, RN

Category:

 Curriculum Integration
Learning Outcomes
Faculty Development

More

Author(s):

 Kobayashi, L., Patterson, M. D., Overly, F. L., Shapiro, M. J., Williams, K. A., & Jay, G. D.

Year:

 2008

Article Name:

 Educational and research implications of portable human patient simulation in acute care medicine.

Publication:

 Academic Emergency Medicine. 15(11), 1166-1174.

Annotation:

 

This article describes the simulation learning opportunities using portable simulation within acute care. They describe the function of the mobile simulation systems. They describe the benefits of bringing simulation to different learning clinical environments, providing an enhanced level of realism into the simulation experience, and increased accessibility for simulation learning. They discuss the benefits, challenges, learning, and research opportunities using portable simulation. The reader can use the experiences of the authors when deciding to develop or enhance a portable simulation model.

Annotated By:

 Andrea Ackermann, PhD, RN, CCRN

Category:

 Curriculum Integration

More

Author(s):

 Young, P. & Burke, J.

Year:

 2010

Article Name:

 Standardized patients in education student nurses: One school’s experience.

Publication:

 Clinical Simulation in Nursing, 6, e45-e52.

Annotation:

 

Young and Burke, who both hold joint positions at Washington State University and Yakima Valley Memorial Hospital, describe a retrospective program evaluation of the Advanced Clinical Education Simulation course, a simulation-based new graduate nurse residency program. Based on learner-centered education, a learning model used by Carl Rogers, the program utilized activities such as simulation and debriefing, hands-on demonstration, and policy review. The evaluation of the program was designed using the same learner-centered principles. Qualitative and quantitative data was collected using original instruments. The researchers found that most students benefited from the course and particularly enjoyed the simulation and camaraderie components of the program. Areas for improvement identified by the students were more structured debriefing time, better organization, and changing the schedule.     

Annotated By:

 Cecily A. Montgomery, RN, BSN

Category:

 Learning Outcomes
Teaching Modalities

More

Author(s):

 Yeager, S. & Gotwals, B.

Year:

 2010

Article Name:

 Incorporating high-fidelity simulation technology into community health nursing education.

Publication:

 Clinical Simulation in Nursing, 6, e53-e59.

Annotation:

 

These authors assert that employing a nurse home visit simulation for baccalaureate nursing students in a community health course is an effective way to decrease student anxiety about home health clinical practicum and increase student knowledge about home health visits. This thorough article describes development, execution, and debriefing of the simulation in detail. Several tables provide lists of props, critical elements, and objectives for the simulation. Most students experienced less anxiety and increased knowledge as a result of participating in the simulation. Yeager is affiliated with St. Luke’s Hospital and Gotwals is affiliated with St. Luke’s School of Nursing, both of Bethlehem, PA.

Annotated By:

 Cecily A. Montgomery, RN, BSN

Category:

 Curriculum Integration

More

Author(s):

 Wickers, M. P.

Year:

 2010

Article Name:

 Establishing the climate for a successful debriefing.

Publication:

 Clinical Simulation in Nursing, 6, e83-e86.

Annotation:

 

Wickers, of Los Angeles Harbor College, presents a compact and readable article on techniques to get the most out of simulation debriefing with nursing students. A major section of this article presents examples of ways to engage students in analysis of the simulation. The article includes a sample of Socratic questions that can be used to aid analysis. Additional topics presented in the paper include: clarifying expectations and objectives, impacting the debriefing through the learning environment, establishing trust between students and facilitators, and addressing every learning style.

Annotated By:

 Cecily A. Montgomery, RN, BSN

Category:

 Curriculum Integration
Faculty Development

More

Author(s):

 Weberg, D.

Year:

 2009

Article Name:

 Twitter and simulation: Tweet your way to better sim.

Publication:

 Clinical Simulation in Nursing, 5, e63-e65.

Annotation:

 

Weberg, of Arizona State University, introduces and defines Twitter as part of Web 2.0. He provides various examples of how Twitter can be used by health care professionals, educators, and students as a news feed and conversation tool, ultimately, to improve simulation. Twitter can also be used to “connect research with community†(p. 64). Weberg asserts that the “open sharing of information is what our future in health care is going to be built on†(p. 64).

Annotated By:

 Cecily A. Montgomery, RN, BSN

Category:

 Faculty Development

More

Page: ()   1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  ()

        
 
Author(s):
Year:
Article:
Publication:
Annotation:
Annotated By:
Category:
Author first name:
Author surname: