Annotated Bibliography

The SIRC Bibliography offers annotations of publications related to simulation topics. These useful descriptions can help guide faculty who are looking for quality sources to investigate further. Now you can search by category as well.

Individuals are invited to submit articles/resources for inclusion by filling out this form. 


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Author(s):

 Harder, B. N.

Year:

 2009

Article Name:

 Evolution of simulation use in health care education

Publication:

 Clinical Simulation in Nursing, 5, e169-e172

Annotation:

 

Harder, a nursing faculty member at the University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, provides a look back into the history and development of the use of simulation in medical and nursing education. Starting with the postwar years, the discussion continues to present day and provides a contrast between the old adage “see one, do one, teach one†and the risk-free environment of the simulation suite. In addition, Harder describes three movements in the use of simulation and says that we are currently in a fourth movement characterized by “advances in accessibility as well as beginning forays into the area of teaching and learning and research†(p. 171).

Annotated By:

 Cecily A. Montgomery, RN, BSN

Category:

 Review Articles

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Author(s):

 Hober, C., Manry, J., & Connelly, L.

Year:

 2009

Article Name:

 Simulation development: The Simmons family.

Publication:

 Clinical Simulation in Nursing, 5, e173-e179

Annotation:

 

Hober, Manry, & Connelly, faculty in the department of nursing at Fort Hays State University, describe the process of developing a nursing simulation curriculum that can be utilized by both baccalaureate and master of nursing programs. A six-member Simulation Task Force used complexity theory to 1) research simulation, 2) develop simulation curriculum, and 3) promote the integration of simulation in theory and clinical courses. One distinct element of this curriculum is the fictional Simmons family: 15 character profiles of a four-generation family that incorporate genetics, family dynamics, ethics, and cultural differences, as well as health concerns. The ultimate goal was to “create a seamless approach for faculty to create and use simulation … [and] to provide comprehensive simulation experiences for students†(p. 174). The results of the pilot study of the curriculum implementation revealed that it was not only a realistic experience for students, but also fostered beginning technical skills and higher level interpersonal skills.

Annotated By:

 Cecily A. Montgomery, RN, BSN

Category:

 Review Articles

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Author(s):

 Cook, D., Hatala, R., Brydges, R., Zendejas, B., Szostek, J., Wang, A., Erwin, P., & Hamstra, S

Year:

 2011

Article Name:

 Technology-enhanced simulation for health professions education: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

Publication:

 . Journal of American Medical Association, 306(9), 978-988.

Annotation:

 

The authors, physician researchers, conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of 609 published studies that evaluated the effect of simulation-based interventions on various outcomes among health care profession learners. The researchers used established quality procedures for conducting and reporting meta-analyses. The inclusion criteria for article selection and the definition of technology-enhanced simulation were broad in this review. In comparison with no intervention, technology-enhanced simulation training in health professions education was consistently associated with large effects for the outcomes of knowledge, skills, and behaviors and moderate effect for patient-related outcomes. This review adds to the existing literature supporting the use of simulation in health care provider education, although as the authors conclude, the results do not provide evidence to guide the design of future simulation activities.

Annotated By:

 Barbara Aronson RN, Ph.D., CNE

Category:

 

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Author(s):

 Rourke, L., Schmidt, M., & Garga, N.

Year:

 2010

Article Name:

 Theory-Based research of high fidelity simulation use in nursing education: A review of the Literature

Publication:

 International Journal of Nursing Education Scholarship, 7(1), 1-14.

Annotation:

 

The authors, nurse educators, conducted a literature review of empirical simulation-based nursing research studies to determine the extent and adequacy of the use of theory in these studies. Studies published between 1989 and 2009 and catalogued in CINAL or Proquest Dissertations and Theses were reviewed. The 87 research studies were classified into the categories of theory use: adequate use of theory (10%), minimal use of theory (45%), or no use of theory (45%). Possible explanations for these results are explored by the authors. Limiting the inclusion criteria for selection of studies to nursing only may have limited the findings.

Annotated By:

 Barbara Aronson RN, Ph.D., CNE

Category:

 

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Author(s):

 Ackerman, A.D., Kenny, G., & Walker, C.

Year:

 2006

Article Name:

 Simulator programs for new nurses’ orientation: A retention strategy

Publication:

 Journal for Nurses in Staff Development, 23(3)

Annotation:

 

The authors are nurse educators from academia and staff development. They describe the development, implementation, and evaluation of a new high-fidelity simulation program for new graduate nurses. They introduce the new nurses to high-risk, low-frequency situations in order to give them an opportunity to practice assessment and decision-making skills in a safe environment. These scenarios were well received by the new nurses and are recommended to assist new nurses during their orientation in an effort to maintain comfort levels and retention in the acute care setting

Annotated By:

 Carol S. Coose, EdD, RN, CNE

Category:

 Learning Outcomes
Teaching Modalities

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Author(s):

 Alessi, S.M.

Year:

 1988

Article Name:

 Fidelity in the design of instructional simulations.

Publication:

 Journal of Computer-Based Instruction, 15(2), 40-47.

Annotation:

 

The author, faculty at the University of Iowa, reported and summarized previous research on levels of fidelity for computer simulation and the effects on learning. He supported a conclusion that the relationship of learning to fidelity of a simulation is non-linear and also presented a proposed model of the relationship curve. The author discussed rationale and ideas regarding when to increase the fidelity of simulations and presented a taxonomy of the factors to consider when determining simulation fidelity. This taxonomy included four types of simulations along with four aspects of simulation to which fidelity is relevant. The author discussed each simulation type in relation to the 4 aspects and fidelity. He concluded with a proposal that learning varies with fidelity as an inverted U-shaped curve for beginning students and that as students progress, they benefit from increasing fidelity. The author discussed the specific research needed regarding the effects of fidelity on learning. Provided some thought-provoking research and insights into fidelity in computer simulation in relation to learning as well as clear ideas for further research.

Annotated By:

 Carol S. Coose, EdD, RN, CNE

Category:

 Learning Outcomes
Teaching Modalities

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Author(s):

 Alinier, G., Hunt, B., Gordon, R., & Harwood, C.

Year:

 2006

Article Name:

 Effectiveness of intermediate-fidelity simulation training technology in undergraduate nursing education.

Publication:

 Journal of Advanced Nursing, 54(3), 359-369.

Annotation:

 

The authors hold a variety of degrees and faculty positions in health sciences at a UK university. They presented results of an experimental study with nursing students in the second year of a Diploma in Higher Education in Adult Nursing (n=99). The results supported their hypothesis that students exposed to scenario-based simulation training would perform better in posttests designed to assess clinical competence of healthcare students than a control group. Results of a pilot study, along with data to support the validity and reliability of the pre and posttests were presented. The improvement in mean score performance by the experimental group (scenario-based simulation training) was found to be statistically significantly higher than the control group. This study also examined student ratings of stress and confidence finding no significant differences between groups. These results provided support for the use of simulation in nursing education and an example/starting point for additional research on use of simulations in nursing education.

Annotated By:

 Carol S. Coose, EdD, RN, CNE

Category:

 Learning Outcomes
Teaching Modalities

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Author(s):

 Bearnson, C.S. & Wiker, K.M.

Year:

 2005

Article Name:

 Human patient simulators: A new face in baccalaureate nursing education at Brigham Young University.

Publication:

 Journal of Nursing Education, 44(9), 421-5.

Annotation:

 

The authors, nursing faculty teaching for a baccalaureate program in Utah, presented results of a limited descriptive study exploring the benefits and limitations of using a human patient simulator (HPS) as a substitute for a day of actual clinical experience for two clinical groups (no number listed) of first year baccalaureate nursing students. The results indicated positive responses from students on a follow-up survey. Statistics were presented, along with examples of qualitative data to support positive results and effectiveness of HPS in enhancing student experiential learning. Instrument development, validity and reliability discussion would have been a valuable addition to this article. The authors discussed the limitations of the study and the need for continued study of HPS in nursing education. The article provided a good starting point for additional HPS research.

Annotated By:

 Carol S. Coose, EdD, RN, CNE

Category:

 Curriculum Integration
Learning Outcomes
Teaching Modalities

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Author(s):

 Aronson, B., Rosa, J., Anfinson, J., & Light, N.

Year:

 1997

Article Name:

 A simulated clinical problem-solving experience.

Publication:

 Nurse Educator, 22(6), 17-19.

Annotation:

 

The authors, faculty in an associate degree nursing program, presented rationale and descriptions, as well as positive results and feedback from both faculty and students (approximately 90), for the use of Clinical Problem Solving Learning Laboratories during the last two semesters of an established nursing program in a community college. They reported using an evaluation tool with students but did not discuss the tool, or provide statistical results. While the evidence presented supported the effectiveness/value of the described use of simulated problem solving for enhancing student learning, the scope is limited to a small/narrow population. Data regarding the survey instrument and some statistical information on the survey results would have been a valuable addition to this article.

Annotated By:

 Carol S. Coose, EdD, RN, CNE

Category:

 Learning Outcomes

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Author(s):

 Issenberg, S. B., McGaghie, W. C., Petrusa, E. R., Gordon, D. L., & Scalese, R. J.

Year:

 2005

Article Name:

 Features and uses of high-fidelity medical simulations that lead to effective learning: A BEME systematic review

Publication:

 Medical Teacher, 27(1), 10-28

Annotation:

 

The authors summarized the activities of the Best Evidence Medical Education (BEME) Collaborative in a project focused on reviewing the existing evidence related to the features and uses of high-fidelity medical simulation leading to effective learning.  This paper describes the methodology and details of the project, the findings and the use of this information within medical education.  A total of 109 articles were reviewed covering 34-years of research articles.  This article includes a table which summarizes 10 identified features and uses of high-fidelity simulators that lead to effective learning coorelated with the number of studies which support each specific feature and use.  The results of this review noted the right conditions are necessary for high-fidelity medical simulation to facilty learning.  In addition, areas lacking research included the introduction of mastery learning models and the need for investigators to expand their breadth and depth of the educational science of simulation from other industries using simulation.

Annotated By:

 Tracy Chesney, MSN-Ed, RN, CNE

Category:

 Review Articles

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