Annotated Bibliography

The SIRC Bibliography offers annotations of publications related to simulation topics. These useful descriptions can help guide faculty who are looking for quality sources to investigate further. Now you can search by category as well.

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Author(s):

 Benhuri, G.

Year:

 2010

Article Name:

 Teaching community telenursing with simulation

Publication:

 Clinical Simulation in Nursing, 6, e161-e163

Annotation:

 

Benhuri holds a position at the College of New Rochelle School of Nursing Center for Learning. She provides an exemplar telenursing simulation scenario that was utilized in a community health course for nursing students. In addition to a list of telenursing equipment used, the scenario is described in detail. One potential future use, especially for schools with limited funds to spend on specialized telenursing equipment, is for students to participate over the internet using videoconferencing.

Annotated By:

 Cecily A. Montgomery, RN, BSN

Category:

 Review Articles

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Author(s):

 Bray, B., Schwartz, C. R., Weeks, D. L., & Kardong-Edgren, S.

Year:

 2009

Article Name:

 Human patient simulation technology: Perceptions from a multidisciplinary sample of health care educators

Publication:

 Clinical Simulation in Nursing, 5, e145-e150

Annotation:

 

Since human patient simulation (HPS) can be costly, the best utilization of resources should be determined. The authors, representatives from pharmacotherapy and nursing departments at Washington State University, surveyed the participants of HPS community forums to discover the opinions of university health sciences faculty and nonuniversity health care providers towards “integrating HPS technology into curricula†(p. 146). They found that most “believed that HPS has a role in health care curricula†(p. 148). In addition, they learned about the perceived barriers to using HPS, including high cost, inadequate faculty training, and lack of support from administration for the time required to implement HPS.

Annotated By:

 Cecily A. Montgomery, RN, BSN

Category:

 Review Articles

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Author(s):

 Brown, D. & Chronister, C.

Year:

 2009

Article Name:

 The effect of simulation learning on critical thinking and self-confidence when incorporated into an electrocardiogram nursing course.

Publication:

 Clinical Simulation in Nursing, 5, e45-e52

Annotation:

 

Brown and Chronister, of the University of Akron, seek to determine whether nursing students who received high-fidelity human simulator (HFHS) experience along with a didactic ECG course would have improved critical thinking and self-confidence compared to students who only received didactic content. Benner’s novice to expert theory provides the theoretical framework for this study. The researchers measured their hypothesis with a “customized, computerized, multiformat exam†and a researcher developed tool (p. 46). Operational definitions of critical thinking and self-confidence are provided. Ultimately, critical thinking was not significantly increased from the control group, but self-confidence increased after HFHS experiences. Yet, numerous limitations require that these results be considered carefully.

Annotated By:

 Cecily A. Montgomery, RN, BSN

Category:

 Review Articles

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Author(s):

 Burns, H. K., O’Donnell, J., & Artman, J.

Year:

 2010

Article Name:

 High-fidelity simulation in teaching problem solving to 1st-year nursing students: A novel use of the nursing process.

Publication:

 Clinical Simulation in Nursing, 6, e87-e95

Annotation:

 

Burns, O’Donnell, and Artman, of the University of Pittsburgh School of Nursing, describe their investigation of the knowledge and attitudes of nursing students who experienced high-fidelity (HF) simulation scenarios designed to introduce them to the nursing process, safety, and communication. Using pre- and post-tests, this study reveals the impact of HF simulation on nursing students prior to their first clinical experiences. It was found that the simulation and debriefing improved students’ understanding of the nursing process. Overall, students were “very satisfied with the simulation experience†(p. 92). Characteristics of the net generation and the importance of including the concept of effective communication in nursing curricula are also discussed.

Annotated By:

 Cecily A. Montgomery, RN, BSN

Category:

 Review Articles

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Author(s):

 Butler, K. W., Veltre, D. E., & Brady, D.

Year:

 2009

Article Name:

 Implementation of active learning pedagogy comparing low-fidelity simulation versus high-fidelity simulation in pediatric nursing education

Publication:

 Clinical Simulation in Nursing, 5, e129-e136

Annotation:

 

Does low-fidelity (LF) versus high-fidelity (HF) simulation affect “…student’s perception of the active learning process?†(p. 131). That is the question that Butler & Veltre, masters prepared nurses at Modesto Junior College, and Brady, a doctor of nursing practice at California State University, seek to answer. Using the nursing education simulation framework as theoretical grounding, students were randomly assigned to the LF or HF simulation scenarios. Immediately following their scenario experience, all participants completed a questionnaire regarding “…simulation design, educational practices, and student satisfaction and self-confidence in learning†(p. 131). Ultimately, the researchers found that, though students preferred HF simulation, both LF and HF simulation promoted active learning.

Annotated By:

 Cecily A. Montgomery, RN, BSN

Category:

 Review Articles

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Author(s):

 Cason, C. L., Cazzell, M. A., Nelson, K. A., Hartman, V., Roye, J., & Mancini, M. E.

Year:

 2010

Article Name:

 Improving learning of airway management with case-based computer microsimulations

Publication:

 Clinical Simulation in Nursing, 6, e15-e23

Annotation:

 

These researchers, affiliated with the University of Texas at Arlington School of Nursing, conducted an experimental study comparing the learning outcomes of lecture and MicroSim (an intelligent tutoring system produced by Laerdal Medical Corporation who also funded the study). Their goal was to determine if MicroSim was as effective as traditional lecture in teaching airway management to senior baccalaureate nursing students in a pediatric nursing course. Synthesis of Benner’s model, Kolb’s theory, and dual code theory as applied to simulation provided the theoretical framework for the study. They found that MicroSim was as effective as traditional lecture in knowledge acquisition, knowledge transfer, and learner receptivity. Other elements of the article included a discussion of neomillennial learners and definition of an intelligent tutoring system.

Annotated By:

 Cecily A. Montgomery, RN, BSN

Category:

 Review Articles

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Author(s):

 Clapper, T. C.

Year:

 2010

Article Name:

 Beyond Knowles: What those conducting simulation need to know about adult learning theory

Publication:

 Clinical Simulation in Nursing, 6, e7-e14.

Annotation:

 

Clapper, affiliated with the Institute for Medical Simulation and Advanced Learning and a self-described public servant, asserts that “teaching for understanding involves more than considering how the learning experience might be made more authentic†(p. 7). The goal of this article is to introduce educators to theories and concepts that teach students to be self-directed, lifelong learners. Knowles’ adult learning theory is discussed and used as a framework to explain what makes an exceptional educator. Above all, Clapper stresses that instruction should be positive and fun. Theories presented in this article include McClusky’s theory of margin, Grow’s staged approach to self-direction, Dunn and Dunn’s learning style inventory, Kolb’s experiential learning theory, Mezirow’s transformative learning theory, constructivist theory, and MacLean’s triune brain theory.

Annotated By:

 Cecily A. Montgomery, RN, BSN

Category:

 Review Articles

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Author(s):

 Decker, S., Moore, A., Thal, W., Opton, L., Caballero, S., & Beasley, M.

Year:

 2010

Article Name:

 Synergistic integration of concept mapping and cause and effect diagramming into simulated experiences

Publication:

 Clinical Simulation in Nursing, 6, e153-e159.

Annotation:

 

The big question in nursing education is: How can we make a nurse who can think critically and be safe and effective? These authors, of Anita Thigpen Perry School of Nursing at Texas Tech University, assert that teaching strategies that can lead to such results are concept mapping and cause-and-effect diagramming coupled with simulation for a synergistic result. The main goal is to use multiple learning styles (visual, aural, read/write, & kinesthetic) to promote meaningful learning through critical and reflective thinking. Specifically, the cause-and-effect diagram technique used is RIOT which stands for root, impression, outcome, and treatment. Ultimately, these authors encourage nurse educators to seek out innovative, evidence-based teaching-learning strategies so that nursing students can have the best foundation for future practice.

Annotated By:

 Cecily A. Montgomery, RN, BSN

Category:

 Review Articles
Faculty Development

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Author(s):

 Fleming, S. E. & Adamson, K. A.

Year:

 2009

Article Name:

 Clinical Simulation in Nursing, 5, e27-e34.

Publication:

 

Annotation:

 

Fleming and Adamson, of Washington State University, share how they employed simulation to enhance their mother baby clinical rotation and provide the tools they used along with their simulation skills lab. A notable result of simulation as a teaching-learning strategy in this case was that hospital staff reported that the students’ skill and knowledge the first day of clinical “exceeded staff’s expectations†and surpassed students from other programs (p. 34).

Annotated By:

 Cecily A. Montgomery, RN, BSN

Category:

 Review Articles

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Author(s):

 Griffin-Sobel, J. P.

Year:

 2009

Article Name:

 The ENTRÉE model for integrating technologically rich learning strategies in a school of nursing

Publication:

 Clinical Simulation in Nursing, 5, e73-e78.

Annotation:

 

As a result of the new standard provided by the Institute of Medicine’s core competencies for health professions education, schools of nursing need a way to effectively integrate technology into curriculum. Some examples of technology that can be integrated include simulation, PDAs, and informatics. Griffin-Sobel, with the Hunter-Bellevue School of Nursing of Hunter College, proposes a model for integration of technology into curriculum that has features of Tyack and Cuban’s and Roger’s change theories. The progressive steps of the ENTRÉE model are: 1) experts as champions, 2) nursing technology integration, 3) transformation of teaching-learning strategies, 4) research, 5) evaluation, and 6) expansion.

Annotated By:

 Cecily A. Montgomery, RN, BSN

Category:

 Review Articles

More

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