Annotated Bibliography

The SIRC Bibliography offers annotations of publications related to simulation topics. These useful descriptions can help guide faculty who are looking for quality sources to investigate further. Now you can search by category as well.

Individuals are invited to submit articles/resources for inclusion by filling out this form. 


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Author(s):

 Sleeper, J. & Thompson, C

Year:

 2008

Article Name:

 The use of hi fidelity simulation to enhance nursing students' therapeutic communication skills

Publication:

 International Journal of Nursing Education Scholarship, 5(1), Article 43

Annotation:

  Students report anxiety and lack of confidence in their own communication skills prior to psychiatric clinical experiences. The researchers designed a response driven algorithm recorded and implanted in a SimMan scenario. Instructors had a male SimMan respond to a student's questioning about depression and suicidal ideation based on instruction provided by their textbooks and didactic classroom instruction. The scenario was tested with psychiatric faculty and two students. The evaluation tool used for the tool is included in the article. Advantages- faculty unfamiliar with psychiatric content could run the simulation. Disadvantages- only one student at a time could participate in the scenario. Recommendations included investigating if students learn/improve communications skills if they observed a peer going through the simulation.

Annotated By:

 Suzie Kardong-Edgren PhD, RN

Category:

 Curriculum Integration
Learning Outcomes
Specialties

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Author(s):

 King, C., Moseley, S., Hindenlang, B. & Kuritz, P.

Year:

 2008

Article Name:

 Limited use of the human patient simulator by nurse faculty: an intervention program designed to Increase use.

Publication:

 International Journal of Nursing Education Scholarship, 5(1), Article 12

Annotation:

  These authors used constructs in the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) to investigate 34 ADN faculty and their reluctance to adopt simulation. Based on these findings, grouped by constructs of attitudes, subjective norms, perceived behavioral control, and intent to use, an educational intervention for faculty was planned. Fifteen faculty members participated in the educational intervention, based on TPB concepts, with great success. Time to learn how to use simulation , competence in simulation , and assistance with running simulation were found to significantly impact adoption of simulation.

Annotated By:

 Suzie Kardong-Edgren PhD, RN

Category:

 Faculty Development

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Author(s):

 Flanagan, B., Nestel, D. & Joseph, M.

Year:

 2004

Article Name:

 Making patient safety the focus: crisis research management in the undergraduate curriculum

Publication:

 Medical Education, 38(1), 56-66.

Annotation:

 

Experts of the Southern Health Simulation and Skills Centre believe that students cannot learn from book knowledge alone. Patient’s safety and limiting human error is the main goal. Human error is the lack of hands on experience and panicking in a stressful situation. In order to make these students more comfortable and experienced, it takes repetition and “real†life situations to get them trained. The best way to accomplish this is through high fidelity simulators that can do “real†life, complex scenarios that are videotaped and corrected right on the spot. This gives the students the practice of feeling, thinking, watching, and performing tasks that will prepare them for the future. Data was collected from the Southern Health experts by a written evaluation of the crisis resource management course. This included their overall experience of the course, and pre and post simulation experience. This was taken from the Nurses in emergency care and anesthesia (n=137), newly qualified doctors (n=30), and Medical students (n=132). The results showed that these simulators were successful.

Annotated By:

 Colleen M. Koopal, WSU, S.N.

Category:

 Curriculum Integration

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Author(s):

 Dubas, J., & Leighton, K.

Year:

 2009

Article Name:

 Simulated death: An innovative approach to teaching end-of-life care

Publication:

 Clinical Simulation in Nursing, 5(6)

Annotation:

 

The authors are nurse educators at BryanLGH College of Health Sciences in Lincoln, Nebraska. They describe the development and experience of a 1-credit-hour theory elective titled Caring in Times of Death, Dying and Bereavement, which is offered to undergraduate nursing students at a Midwestern college. The simulation utilized was the Simulated Clinical Experience (SCE) End-of-Life Care from the Program for Nursing Curriculum Integration and was supported by evidence-based practice and research findings. Major themes identified in a debriefing after the simulated experience were: impact of family presence, value of realism (fidelity), and self-efficacy. Implication for future research included a qualitative study to address student nurses feelings when caring for the dying patient and a longitudinal study to determine whether the experience affected future practice.

Annotated by:

       
Caitlin E. Labberton, SN, WSU

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The authors are experienced nurses that performed a study on the competency in providing end-of-life care by nursing students and practicing nurses. They explained that participation in simulated clinical experience enhances self-efficacy and competency levels of students’ more than experiential learning alone. They presented a sample curriculum module that contains a lesson objective, course outcome and simulated clinical experience outcome. The article also provided an approach on different dying states, their assessments and evaluations and appropriate response to various scenarios. Themes were identified in participant evaluations and they include impact of family presence, value of realism (fidelity) and self-efficacy of which were explored.

Annotated By:

 Camille A. Penaflor, SN WSU-CON

Category:

 Debriefing

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Author(s):

 Leighton, K., & Dubas, J.

Year:

 2009

Article Name:

 Simulated Death: An Innovative Approach to Teaching End-of-Life Care

Publication:

 Clinical Simulation in Nursing, VOL(5)

Annotation:

 

The authors are nurse educators at BryanLGH College of Health Sciences in Lincoln, Nebraska. They describe the development and experience of a 1-credit-hour theory elective titled Caring in Times of Death, Dying and Bereavement, which is offered to undergraduate nursing students at a Midwestern college. The simulation utilized was the Simulated Clinical Experience (SCE) End-of-Life Care from the Program for Nursing Curriculum Integration and was supported by evidence-based practice and research findings. Major themes identified in a debriefing after the simulated experience were: impact of family presence, value of realism (fidelity), and self-efficacy. Implication for future research included a qualitative study to address student nurses feelings when caring for the dying patient and a longitudinal study to determine whether the experience affected future practice.

Annotated By:

 Caitlin E. Labberton, SN, WSU

Category:

 Interprofessional

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Author(s):

 Cam A. Hamilton MSN. RN

Year:

 2009

Article Name:

 The simulation Imperative of End of Life Education

Publication:

 

Annotation:

 

The author describes the value of using high-fidelity simulation programs to allow nurses to experience end of life situations with patients. It was found that nurses felt more confident in end of life situations and were able to evaluate their innate reactions to death. The scenarios were well received by new nurses and it was found that confronting anxiety and responses before experiencing a patients death allows the nurse to better care for the needs of families and patients.

Annotated By:

 Barbara Weston SN, WSU

Category:

 Review Articles

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Author(s):

 Ackermann, A.D.

Year:

 2009

Article Name:

 Investigation of learning outcomes for the acquisition and retention of CPR knowledge and skills learned with the use of high-fidelity simulation.

Publication:

 Clinical Simulation in Nursing, 5, e213-e222.

Annotation:

 

Ackerman, of Mount Saint Mary College, conducted a study of the cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) knowledge acquisition and retention of baccalaureate nursing students. Using Benner’s novice to expert theory as framework, the goal was to ascertain whether high-fidelity human patient simulation (HPS) affected CPR knowledge acquisition and 3-month retention compared to traditional CPR certification methods. In addition to demographic data, Ackerman compiled data on participants’ previous education and experience with CPR on a live person. The study revealed that both groups’ knowledge retention decreased but, participants who experienced the simulation scenario had better retention than those who did not. Further, participants who had CPR experience with a live person had better scores than either group.

Annotated By:

 Cecily A. Montgomery, RN, BSN

Category:

 Review Articles
Faculty Development

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Author(s):

 Adamson, K.

Year:

 2010

Article Name:

 Integrating human patient simulation into associate degree nursing curricula: Faculty experiences, barriers, and facilitators.

Publication:

 Clinical Simulation in Nursing, 6, e75-e81

Annotation:

 

Adamson, a doctoral student, conducted a qualitative survey among deans and directors of associate degree nursing (ADN) programs in a Western state. The goal of the study was to assess the number of ADN programs in a Western state with human patient simulation (HPS) equipment and equipment usage in order to determine whether HPS resources are being used to their fullest potential. The second phase of the study evaluated faculty experiences with HPS and their perceptions of barriers, facilitators, and incentives for HPS use. The investigator found that programs with HPS equipment used it 0-4 hours per week and that 71% of survey participants had used HPS in a course. Barriers to HPS use identified by faculty were lack of time, support, training, and incentive. In general, Adamson reported that study findings were consistent with previous research in this field.

Annotated By:

 Cecily A. Montgomery, RN, BSN

Category:

 Review Articles

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Author(s):

 Anderson, M., Holmes, T. L., LeFlore, J. L., Nelson, K. A., & Jenkins, T.

Year:

 2010

Article Name:

 Standardized patients in educating student nurses: One school’s experience

Publication:

 Clinical Simulation in Nursing, 6, e61-e66.

Annotation:

 

These authors describe the experience of implementing a standardized patient program (SPP) and provide a synthesis of information that was presented at meetings such as the 2008 Society for Simulation in Healthcare Meeting, the National League for Nursing Education Summit 2008, and the 2009 Association for Standardized Patient Educators Conference. Topics covered are integration of SPs into a nursing program, student interaction with SPs, and questions to consider in the process of starting an SPP. A thorough table illustrates exactly how the nursing school integrated SPs into both undergraduate and graduate courses.

Annotated By:

 Cecily A. Montgomery, RN, BSN

Category:

 

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Author(s):

 Arnold, J. J., Johnson, L. M., Tucker, S. J., Malec, J. F., Henrickson, S. E., & Dunn, W. F.

Year:

 2009

Article Name:

 Evaluation tools in simulation learning: Performance and self-efficacy in emergency response

Publication:

 Clinical Simulation in Nursing, 5, e35-e43.

Annotation:

 

One major deficit in the field of simulation research is a lack of valid and reliable evaluation tools. This study, by researchers mainly from the Mayo Clinic, begins to resolve that deficit by reporting “the validity and reliability…of an emergency response performance tool (ERPT)†as well as a self-efficacy tool (p. 36). Using Bandura’s theory as the theoretical framework, they guessed that self-efficacy predicts performance when it comes to emergency situations. They found that the ERPT was reliable and valid and that the self-efficacy tool was reliable and reflected internal consistency. Regarding their hypothesis, the data supported their position that self-efficacy predicts performance.

Annotated By:

 Cecily A. Montgomery, RN, BSN

Category:

 Review Articles

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