Annotated Bibliography

The SIRC Bibliography offers annotations of publications related to simulation topics. These useful descriptions can help guide faculty who are looking for quality sources to investigate further. Now you can search by category as well.

Individuals are invited to submit articles/resources for inclusion by filling out this form. 


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Author(s):

 Skiba, D.

Year:

 2007

Article Name:

 Nursing education 2.0: Second life.

Publication:

 Nursing Education Perspectives, 28(3), 157-157.

Annotation:

  The author, a much published nursing faculty from a Colorado university, presented information and details of an emerging technology called virtual worlds, and how one called ‘Second Life’ (SL) could be used to transform/enhance nursing education. SL was described as a 3D virtual world built and owned entirely by its residents, thus it provides opportunity for the use of simulation to enhance skills practice, experiential learning, and experimenting with new ideas. The author states that virtual worlds work well with constructivist learning theory and presented several resources for faculty interested in this web tool. She also presented several very good examples of the use of virtual worlds in health education including the Center for Disease Control and the American Cancer Society. Provided an excellent information resource for nursing faculty seeking innovative technology to incorporate into nursing education.

Annotated By:

 Carol S. Coose, EdD, RN, CNE

Category:

 Teaching Modalities

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Author(s):

 Solnick, A., & Weiss, S.

Year:

 2007

Article Name:

 High fidelity simulation in nursing education: A review of the literature.

Publication:

 INACSL Online Journal, 3(1), 7 p.

Annotation:

  The authors, the LRC director for the college of health professions and nursing faculty at Temple University, examined and discussed current research studies conducted since 1998 on the use of high fidelity simulation (HFS) in nursing education. They provided a summary table of 8 research studies meeting the criteria for their study as well as detailed description, evaluation, and limitations of each study. They concluded the article with recommendations for future research of HFS in nursing. The article provided very valuable evaluation of HFS nursing studies and detailed recommendations for the development of valid, reliable research that could be generalized to a broader population.

Annotated By:

 Carol S. Coose, EdD, RN, CNE

Category:

 Review Articles
Faculty Development

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Author(s):

 Spunt, D.

Year:

 2006

Article Name:

 Ask the nurse expert: Simulation advice.

Publication:

 INACSL Online Journal, 2(1).

Annotation:

  The expert, nursing faculty at a university in Maryland, responded to four questions posed by the guest editor regarding use of simulation in nursing education. This expert reported several strengths of simulation use and some creative ways to make simulation more realistic particularly in the home setting. She identified students’ increased ability to identify their own strengths and weaknesses as the major outcome of simulation use, and listed some of the methods used in her nursing school to provide faculty development and support in the use of simulation. This article provided some realistic and detailed ideas for use in home-based simulation in nursing educations.

Annotated By:

 Carol S. Coose, EdD, RN, CNE

Category:

 Faculty Development

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Author(s):

 Spunt, D., Foster, D. & Adams K.

Year:

 2004

Article Name:

 Mock code: A clinically simulated module.

Publication:

 Nurse Educator, 29(5), 192-94.

Annotation:

  The authors, director of clinical simulation laboratory, nursing faculty and coordinator of clinical simulation lab at a Maryland university, along with a clinical coordinator from a hospital in Maryland, reported on the design and implementation of a mock code program into their undergraduate nursing curriculum. They described in detail the curriculum development and implementation of the simulation, as well as the their evaluation of this simulation learning experience along with support documentation from available literature. They concluded that there is a need for a reliable and valid instrument for use in evaluation of clinical simulation modules and suggested a longitudinal study to examine and compare traditional methods with simulation learning throughout the curriculum. As the authors stated, a structured study along with some statistical data and testing of an instrument would have been a meaningful addition to this article. However, it provided some clear, descriptive and anecdotal information on the use of simulation in undergraduate nursing education.

Annotated By:

 Carol S. Coose, EdD, RN, CNE

Category:

 Curriculum Integration

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Author(s):

 Thiele, J., Holloway, J., Murphy, D., Pardavis, J. & Stuckey, M.

Year:

 1991

Article Name:

 Perceived and actual decision making by novice baccalaureate students.

Publication:

 Western Journal of Nursing Research, 13, 616-626.

Annotation:

  The authors, nursing faculty for an intercollegiate nursing education center in Washington, reported their findings from a study using a three-part written simulation with junior level baccalaureate nursing students (n = 82) in their first clinical course. Validity and reliability were discussed for one of the instruments used to gather data. Descriptive statistics were presented and discussed as were the limitations and needs for further study. The authors stated that the positive responses by students to the simulation experiences supported the continued development and use of simulations to promote decision-making and learning. They reported that novice students evidenced a general pattern of cue over-selection and were also hesitant about decision-making. The article provided an excellent example/pattern for more research in the area of perceived decision-making and the use of case-study simulations.

Annotated By:

 Carol S. Coose, EdD, RN, CNE

Category:

 Learning Outcomes

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Author(s):

 Tomey, A.

Year:

 2003

Article Name:

 Learning with cases.

Publication:

 The Journal of Continuing Education in Nursing, 34(1), 34-37.

Annotation:

  The author, nursing faculty at a large university in the Midwest, presented a review of literature on the use of case studies for learning, followed by guidelines and suggestions for developing and implementing case studies specific to nursing education. The author concluded that case studies facilitate active and reflective learning and can result in the development of critical thinking and problem-solving skills, thus helping the learner to become a self-directed, lifelong learner. A structured study to support these conclusions would have been a valuable addition to this article. The article provided practical ideas with support of literature for using case studies to enhance learning in nursing education.

Annotated By:

 Carol S. Coose, EdD, RN, CNE

Category:

 Teaching Modalities

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Author(s):

 Waldner, M., & Olson, J.

Year:

 2007

Article Name:

 Taking the patient to the classroom: Applying theoretical frameworks to simulation in nursing education.

Publication:

 International Journal of Nursing Education Scholarship, 4(1), Article 18, 14 pages.

Annotation:

  The authors, nursing faculty from a Canadian university, discussed the reasons for and the variety of simulation activities used in nursing education in the context of two learning theories. The theories discussed are Benner’s model of novice to expert skill acquisition/expertise and Kolb’s experiential learning theory. The article provided discussion/suggestions for the use of simulation to enhance/advance nursing education at each level of expertise in Benner’s model while also applying Kolb’s theory. The authors concluded that these two theories, as described in their article, could become a beginning point for developing a theoretical framework to support the development and use of simulation in nursing education. The article provided descriptive and theoretical ideas for the development and use of simulation in nursing education.

Annotated By:

 Carol S. Coose, EdD, RN, CNE

Category:

 Curriculum Integration

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Author(s):

 Weis, P. & Guyton-Simmons, J.

Year:

 1998

Article Name:

 A computer simulation for teaching critical thinking skills.

Publication:

 Nurse Educator, 23(2), 30-33.

Annotation:

  The authors, a graduate student in a nursing masters program and a nursing faculty member, described the development and implementation of a computer simulation used with last semester, associate degree nursing students (n=14). Details of the simulation, including development, an example of the scenario, and the implementation were presented as well as descriptive results of student performance on and responses to the simulation. Validity and reliability were not discussed. A structured study with supporting statistical analysis would have been a positive addition to this article. Presented literature and anecdotal results to support the use of computer simulation for developing critical thinking skills of nursing students.

Annotated By:

 Carol S. Coose, EdD, RN, CNE

Category:

 Learning Outcomes
Teaching Modalities

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Author(s):

 Wilson, M., Shepherd, C, & Pitzner, J.

Year:

 2005

Article Name:

 Assessment of a low-fidelity human patient simulator for the acquisition of nursing skills.

Publication:

 Nurse Education Today, 25, 56-67.

Annotation:

 

The authors, nurse educators for a health care organization in Australia, reported on a study of nurses’ perceptions about the realism and suitability of a specific low-fidelity human patient simulator (LFHPS) for educating nurses or nursing students (n = 70). The study was completed using an assessment tool developed for the study and comparing the manikin to other teaching tools such as a textbook. Results showed the participants perceived that most of the components/functions of the LPHPS were realistic, better than existing training products and suitable for teaching purposes. The authors concluded that LFHPS may facilitate experiential learning and improve health assessment competence of nurses, and that the use of simulators has potential to reduce the risk of adverse events and improve patient outcomes. Demographic and descriptive statistics per survey item are presented and discussed. Comparative statistics between different nursing groups’ perceptions evidenced some significant differences, which are presented and discussed. Provided evidence of the value and uses of LFHPS in educating nurses.

Annotated By:

 Carol S. Coose, EdD, RN, CNE

Category:

 Curriculum Integration

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Author(s):

 Wong, T., & Chung, J.

Year:

 2002

Article Name:

 Diagnostic reasoning process using patient simulation in different learning environments.

Publication:

 Journal of Clinical Nursing, 11, 65-72

Annotation:

  The authors, nursing faculty at a university in Hong Kong, reported on a case-study research that explored the diagnostic reasoning processes of nursing students in their last year of study (n = 20) from two different nursing schools. The Biggs’ Study Process Questionnaire (SPQ) was used to evaluate study approach of the participants followed by completion and videotaping of three case scenarios with a Human Patient Simulator (HPS) and an interview following each scenario. Results showed no significant difference in study approaches between the two groups and no particular advantages from either of the two learning environments (nursing school or university). The reasoning processes of students are described and discussed in the article. While the study was not specific to HPS or their value or outcomes, simulations with HPS were used to allow and assist with the study of nursing students’ reasoning and decision-making processes.

Annotated By:

 Carol S. Coose, EdD, RN, CNE

Category:

 Learning Outcomes

More

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