Annotated Bibliography

The SIRC Bibliography offers annotations of publications related to simulation topics. These useful descriptions can help guide faculty who are looking for quality sources to investigate further. Now you can search by category as well.

Individuals are invited to submit articles/resources for inclusion by filling out this form. 


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Author(s):

 Beyea, S., von Reyn, L., & Slattery, M

Year:

 2007

Article Name:

 A nurse residency program for competency development using human patient simulation

Publication:

 Journal for Nurses in Staff Development, 23(2), 77–82

Annotation:

 

A 12 week nurse residency program was piloted including both computer-based and high fidelity manikin simulation in conjunction with didactic and clinical practice with preceptors.  Weekly scenarios developed in collaboration with managers and clinical experts, focused on common processes as well as high risk scenarios. This program standardized orientation length with reported increases in new graduate self-confidence and competence.  Unit managers stated participants were better prepared in both role perception and skills.  In addition, performance concerns were identified during simulation leading to skill reinforcement.

Annotated By:

 Lynn Phillips

Category:

 Faculty Development

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Author(s):

 Birkhoff, S., & Donner, C.

Year:

 2010

Article Name:

 Enhancing pediatric clinical competency with high-fidelity simulation.

Publication:

 Journal of Continuing Education in Nursing, 41(9), 418–423. doi:10.3928/00220124-20100503-03

Annotation:

 

The author suggests that a Pediatric Advanced Life Support (PALS) course can be enhanced by the addition of high-fidelity simulation.  19 participants of this PALS course indicated that the dynamic patient changes foster more interaction and helped them practice communication.  79% stated they were ready to practice PALS after the first day of the workshop.  This should be considered in light of the fact that 63% of the sample were attending PALS certification for the first time.  Further research on the efficacy of PALS simulation and patient/provider outcomes is recommended.

Annotated By:

 Lynn Phillips

Category:

 

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Author(s):

 Hallenbeck, V. J.

Year:

 2012

Article Name:

 Use of high-fidelity simulation for staff education/development: a systematic review of the literature

Publication:

 Journal For Nurses In Staff Development: JNSD: Official Journal Of The National Nursing Staff Development Organization, 28(6), 260. doi:10.1097/NND.0b013e31827259c7

Annotation:

 

A systematic review of literature regarding hospital-based simulation revealed 16 articles. Six of these articles were focused on the process of enacting simulation, leaving 10 research-based studies.  Nine studies were descriptive and suggested the benefits of HFS for new graduate orientation as well as ongoing competency validation.  Instruments included various surveys and questionnaires and in one case, a chart review.  One qualitative study used content analysis to identify themes and one randomized control trial compared simulator fidelity for ACLS training and found no significant difference.  The author concludes that although there are societal factors driving increased use of simulation, there is not yet enough research evidence that this teaching strategy has a direct effect on patient outcomes.  Other forms of quality education may be as effective.

Annotated By:

 Lynn Phillips

Category:

 

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Author(s):

 Ellaway, R. H., Kneebone, R., Lachapelle, K., & Topps, D

Year:

 2009

Article Name:

 Practica continua: Connecting and combining simulation modalities for integrated teaching, learning and assessment

Publication:

 Medical Teacher, 31(8), 725–731.

Annotation:

 

This article describes the benefits of a continuum of simulation learning.  Drawing from Vygotsky’s zones of proximal development and other skills acquisition theories, the author argue students should have repeated learning opportunities that progress from isolated skills to learning in the clinical setting.  A range of simulations including virtual, multi-modal and progressive scenarios that start with a virtual patient and then progress to a standardized patient or manikin-based scenario are advocated.  Opportunities to practice in the clinical setting with manikins or standardized patients are also recommended.  The vision of the future is that all of these technologies will be seamlessly integrated passing information about the learner choices and performance to the next simulation modality so it is perceived by the learner as a single scenario. 

Annotated By:

 Lynn Phillips

Category:

 

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Author(s):

 Schmidt, E., Goldhaber-Fiebert, S., Ho, L., & McDonald, K

Year:

 2013

Article Name:

 Simulation exercises as a patient safety strategy: a systematic review

Publication:

 Annals of Internal Medicine, 158(5 Pt 2), 426–432. doi:10.7326/0003-4819-158-5-201303051-00010

Annotation:

 

This systematic review of research that links simulation to patient safety or clinician outcomes found 38 articles.  Based on multiple studies, simulation does improve resident and physician performance on tasks as varied as central line insertion and laparoscopy.  Decreased number of pnuemothoraces and catheter-related blood stream infections were also reported.  Nursing students had fewer medication errors when using simulation.  One study involving paramedics did not show significant differences with simulation in terms of intubation performance.  Team performance was enhanced by a one-day simulation workshop for obstetrics teams, resulting in more babies born with APGAR’s over 6.  However, there was no evidence that the context of training, either in situ or laboratory had an effect on patient safety.  The authors recommend standardized reporting of simulation research and more research on direct patient safety outcomes.

Annotated By:

 Lynn Phillips

Category:

 

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Author(s):

 Teel, C S. MacIntyre, R. C. Murray, T.A. Rock, K.Z.

Year:

 2011

Article Name:

 Common themes in clinical education partnerships

Publication:

 Journal of Nursing Education, 50(7), 365–372. doi:10.3928/01484834-20110429-01

Annotation:

 

This paper details innovative practice partnerships.  While not directly about simulation, three different examples of partnering between academic institutions and practice settings are described.  Themes derived from multiple interviews described successful partnerships as being flexible, requiring skilled communication, a good fit for both partners and supported by all levels of management at both sites.

Annotated By:

 Lynn Phillips

Category:

 

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Author(s):

 Jeffries, P., Battin, J., Franklin, M., Savage, R., Yowler, H., Sims, C., … Dorsey, L.

Year:

 2013

Article Name:

 Creating a professional development plan for a simulation consortium

Publication:

 Clinical Simulation in Nursing, 9(6), e183–9. doi:10.1016/j.ecns.2012.02.003

Annotation:

 

The Southeast Indiana Healthcare Consortium was created in 2008 and consists of leaders and educators from clinical practice, post-secondary education and secondary education.  Started by grant money, this organization completed a needs assessment and defined a vision and long-term strategy to build simulation into educational programs and increase nursing graduates within the region.  Faculty development was identified as a priority, so a workshop conducted by an expert and access to online training modules was provided.  10 simulation centers were built or renovated.  Through sharing of resources such as simulation centers and scenarios as well as expertise including technology support, the consortia continues to realize countless benefits.  Outcomes include large numbers (200-500/month) of nursing students, hospital-based employees and secondary school students experiencing simulation as well as over 60 educators participating in faculty development. 

Annotated By:

 Lynn Phillips

Category:

 

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Author(s):

 De Geest, S., Sullivan Marx, E., Rich, V., Spichiger, E., Schwendimann, R., Spirig, R., & Van Malderen, G

Year:

 2010

Article Name:

 Developing a financial framework for academic service partnerships: Models of the United States and Europe.

Publication:

 Journal of Nursing Scholarship, 42(3), 295–304. doi:10.1111/j.1547-5069.2010.01355.x

Annotation:

 

The authors expect the need for academic/service partnerships (ASP’s) will increase due to factors such as the increased emphasis on outcomes research which requires access to patient populations; the need for nurses to be trained in practice settings, and the need for development of a safer, more efficient healthcare system.  Key attributes of these partnerships are explained and different models for partnering are discussed in the context of two different case studies.  Specifics about faculty sharing and provision of education for hospital employees are helpful to explore the range of possibilities.  Strong leadership, vision and a commitment from both parties to be transparent are described as the foundation for ASP’s.

Annotated By:

 

Category:

 

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Author(s):

 Gantt, L. T.

Year:

 2011

Article Name:

 Strategic planning for skills and simulation labs in colleges of nursing

Publication:

 Nursing Economic$, 28(5), 308–313

Annotation:

 

Strategic planning for simulation laboratories is an essential task that will become more important as demand for simulation increases.  This process begins with identifying the needs of the community and formulating goals to meet those needs that also align with the university, college and/or department strategic plan.  Various tools for strategic planning are described with the SWOT (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, Threats) model reviewed in detail.  Examples of goals and accompanying action plans are also given.  The authors recommend at least an annual review of strategic plans.

Annotated By:

 Lynn Phillips

Category:

 

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Author(s):

 Senger, B., Stapleton, L., & Gorski, M.

Year:

 2012

Article Name:

 A hospital and university partnership model for simulation education.

Publication:

 Clinical Simulation in Nursing, 8(9), e477–82. doi:10.1016/j.ecns.2011.09.002

Annotation:

 

This article describes the progression of an academic/service partnership. Initial similar philosophies and mutual needs for students and professional nurse learning led to the creation of a hospital-based simulation learning center used by both the university students and the hospital staff. Resources in terms of faculty and equipment were allocated from one partner or the other according to an agreement. The shared space also led to shared simulations. Nursing students participated with professional nurses for unit-specific professional development. A post-simulation survey described benefit in terms of improved teamwork and confidence.

Annotated By:

 Lynn Phillips

Category:

 

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