Annotated Bibliography

The SIRC Bibliography offers annotations of publications related to simulation topics. These useful descriptions can help guide faculty who are looking for quality sources to investigate further. Now you can search by category as well.

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Author(s):

 Gum, L., Greenhill, J., & Dix, K

Year:

 2010

Article Name:

 Clinical simulation in maternity (CSiM): interprofessional learning through simulation team training.

Publication:

 Quality & Safety In Health Care, 19(5), e19. doi:10.1136/qshc.2008.030767

Annotation:

 

16 rural obstetrics practitioners completed a simulation workshop including Crisis Resource Management, didactic and skills stations as well as simulation scenarios surrounding obstetrical emergencies. Semi-structured interviews at 1-2 wks and 3-6 months post-workshop were reviewed for themes. Collaboration was identified as a major theme with subthemes including becoming more aware of their own roles as well as other’s roles, becoming aware of the mutual benefit of working together and being better able to appraise leadership skills. Simulation was viewed as a helpful tool to increase teamwork and collaboration for rural OB practitioners in Australia. What is not known is whether this improved teamwork results in improved patient outcomes.

Annotated By:

 Lynn Phillips

Category:

 Interprofessional

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Author(s):

 Wagner, Janet; Liston, Beth; Miller, Jackie

Year:

 2011

Article Name:

 Developing interprofessional communication skills.

Publication:

 Teaching & Learning In Nursing, 6(3), 97-101. doi:10.1016/j.teln.2010.12.003

Annotation:

 

This pilot study of 10 senior nursing and 10 4th year medical students involved a standardized patient as a family member, with the student task identified as discussing end-of-life decisions for the mother.  In order to practice negotiation and communication, nursing students, but not medical students, were informed the mother had metastatic CA and did not want treatment.  Joint debriefing helped to uncover barriers to collaboration.  Both medical and nursing students felt this was a valuable exercise and helped prepare them to work in interdisciplinary teams.  Despite difficulty in scheduling and cost, IPE is essential to teach interdisciplinary collaboration.

Annotated By:

 Lynn Phillips

Category:

 Interprofessional

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Author(s):

 King, A., Conrad, M., & Ahmed, R

Year:

 2013

Article Name:

 Improving collaboration among medical, nursing and respiratory therapy students through interprofessional simulation

Publication:

 Journal Of Interprofessional Care, 27(3), 269-271 doi:10.3109/13561820.2012.730076

Annotation:

 

34 nursing, medical and respiratory therapy students participated in a scenario involving a high-fidelity simulation of a patient with respiratory distress. The team included 4-6 students and was 15 -20 minutes long followed by 15 minute debriefing and then a 50 minute group debriefing. Students rated the experience as meeting the interprofessional objectives and conducive to learning. They also commented that communication was important and that they learned about other roles and how to improve communication.

Annotated By:

 Lynn Phillips

Category:

 Interprofessional

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Author(s):

 Miller, K., Riley, W., Davis, S., & Hansen, H

Year:

 2008

Article Name:

 In situ simulation: a method of experiential learning to promote safety and team behavior

Publication:

 The Journal Of Perinatal & Neonatal Nursing, 22(2), 105-113. doi:10.1097/01.JPN.0000319096.97790.f7

Annotation:

 

This multi-site study involved over 700 participants in groups of 20.  3 scenarios depicting obstetric and neonatal emergencies were enacted in situ on the hospital units using both actors and high-fidelity manikins.  Briefing directed the focus of the team to communication and not performance.  An extensive 2 hour debriefing using video playback was used to discuss communication using concepts of situation awareness, shared mental models, and SBAR-R and closed-loop communication.  Unique to this study was a follow-up survey several months after to measure the culture of safety.  Notably, while other units in these hospitals experienced a decline in staff perception of safety, the units involved in the simulation experienced an increase.  The information from the study was used to design real changes on the hospital units that could affect patient outcomes.  The authors concluded that in situ simulation is an effective method for team training.

Annotated By:

 Lynn Phillips

Category:

 Interprofessional

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Author(s):

 Norsen, L., & Spillane, L

Year:

 2012

Article Name:

 Partnering in interprofessional education to design simulation programs to promote collaboration and patient safety

Publication:

 Creative Nursing, 18(3), 109-113.

Annotation:

 

This discussion of the development process for two IPE programs for medical students, new nursing graduates or Nurse Practitioners and pharmacy students includes many helpful details.  The authors highlight the importance of including faculty from all the disciplines when developing interprofessional simulation cases as well as training the faculty in debriefing to focus on the teamwork and not the clinical skills.  Adding 20 minutes of didactic to explain  concepts from TeamSTEPPS such as shared mental models, and closed-loop communication, then emphasizing use of these skills during repeated simulation scenarios and debriefing has added tremendous value to the IPE program.

Annotated By:

 Lynn Phillips

Category:

 Interprofessional

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Author(s):

 Smith, J., & Cole, F.

Year:

 2009

Article Name:

 Patient safety: effective interdisciplinary teamwork through simulation and debriefing in the neonatal ICU

Publication:

 Critical Care Nursing Clinics Of North America, 21(2), 163-179. doi:10.1016/j.ccell.2009.01.006

Annotation:

 

This review article integrates topics of team training with hospital-based simulation and applies the findings to the specific needs of the NICU. An extensive review of the causes of communication failure and best practices for communication including Crew Resource Management and SBAR is also included. Hospital-based use of simulation to train NICU teams is recommended. The literature gap identified by this article is the lack of outcomes studies that support the effects of team training in terms of patient outcomes in general and for the NICU specifically.

Annotated By:

 Lynn Phillips

Category:

 Interprofessional

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Author(s):

 Van Schaik, M. L., Plant, J., Diane, S., Tsang, L., & O’Sullivan, P.

Year:

 2011

Article Name:

 Interprofessional team training in pediatric resuscitation: A low-cost, in situ simulation program that enhances self-efficacy among participants.

Publication:

 Clinical Pediatrics, 50(9), 807–815. doi:10.1177/0009922811405518

Annotation:

 

This IPE program for nurses, residents, pharmacists and respiratory therapists was developed to increase competence and confidence with pediatric resuscitation. Following in situ simulation using medium fidelity manikins and direct observation by a physician and nurse instructor who participated in debriefing, residents reported increased confidence and nurses reported increased self-efficacy. Challenges to implementation and areas for future improvement are described. A sample scenario and checklist is included. Measurement of teamwork in addition to confidence and competence is recommended.

Annotated By:

 Lynn Phillips

Category:

 Interprofessional

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Author(s):

 Hicks, C., Bandiera, G., & Denny, C

Year:

 2008

Article Name:

 Building a simulation-based crisis resource management course for emergency medicine, phase 1: Results from an interdisciplinary needs assessment survey

Publication:

 Academic Emergency Medicine: Official Journal Of The Society For Academic Emergency Medicine, 15(11), 1136-1143. doi:10.1111/j.1553-2712.2008.00185.x

Annotation:

 

A survey and focus group interviews of emergency department (ED) team members (N= 84) confirmed the need for a formalized crew resource management training program.  More than 40% of physicians, residents and nurses reported no crew resource management training.  100% reported that team leadership and communication were very important to successful ER resuscitation.  The majority implicated human factors (such as those addressed in CRM) as more important to ED outcomes than medical knowledge.  Simulation was listed as the preferred as the method to teach CRM.  Overall this needs assessment demonstrated support for implementing CRM tailored to the specific needs of this multi-disciplinary group.

Annotated By:

 Lynn Phillips

Category:

 

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Author(s):

 Quaas, B., & Bjorklund, P

Year:

 2012

Article Name:

 Start-up of a simulation center in an acute care hospital

Publication:

 Journal Of Continuing Education In Nursing, 43(6), 277-283. doi:10.3928/00220124-20120215-51

Annotation:

 

This paper presents a detailed cost analysis for setting up a hospital-based simulation lab with 1 high-fidelity manikin. Physician and staff costs were 91,755 (in 2008).  360 internal students generated revenue of 21,275 that departments paid for completion of ACLS training.  Allowing for maintenance (1 manikin) and supply costs for the first year of operation this simulation lab cost 72,283 to run (not including initial capital outlay).  Future use of the simulation center for staff training for low frequency high risk occurrences might result in improved patient outcomes.  Collaboration with local colleges and universities for scenario writing is recommended to reduce costs.

Annotated By:

 Lynn Phillips

Category:

 

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Author(s):

 Aebersold, M

Year:

 2011

Article Name:

 Using simulation to improve the use of evidence-based practice guidelines.

Publication:

 Western Journal of Nursing Research, 33(3), 296–305.

Annotation:

 

This study highlights the difficulty nurses have in applying EBP during patient care. ICU nurses participated in a simulation of an ICU patient with sepsis. The manikin was programmed to respond positively to actions consistent with, evidence-based protocols. 62 of 78 nurses recognized sepsis but only 35 followed EBP. Debriefing was used to discuss the scenario, but also to teach about EBP in hopes the nurses would return to their units and share the information with colleagues as well as use evidence-based protocols for sepsis treatment during patient care

Annotated By:

 Lynn Phillips

Category:

 

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