Annotated Bibliography

The SIRC Bibliography offers annotations of publications related to simulation topics. These useful descriptions can help guide faculty who are looking for quality sources to investigate further. Now you can search by category as well.

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Author(s):

 Miller, H, Nichols, E., & Beeken, J.

Year:

 2000

Article Name:

 Comparing videotaped and faculty-present return demonstrations of clinical skills.

Publication:

 Journal of Nursing Education, 39(5),237-9.

Annotation:

 

The authors, nursing faculty at a university in Wyoming, reported on a quasi-experimental study conducted with junior level baccalaureate nursing students (n = 48) in their first clinical course. The study was designed to determine if there were differences in performance or student satisfaction based on the type of return demonstration (faculty-present or videotaped demonstration) completed in the nursing skills lab. Validity of the performance checklists used in the study was discussed along with the results of a pilot study done to test for reliability and validity of the instruments used. Results of the study indicated no significant differences in the performance of students between the two groups, however the videotaped demonstrations involved significantly less faculty time for evaluation. Both faculty and students were significantly more satisfied with the faculty-present method. Statistics were presented, limitations discussed, along with the need for some improvements or changes in the process used. Provided a good beginning for further study of the use of videotaping of return demonstrations, and mostly supported the use of faculty-present return demonstrations.

Annotated By:

 Carol S. Coose, EdD, RN, CNE

Category:

 Learning Outcomes
Teaching Modalities

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Author(s):

 Morton, P.

Year:

 1999

Article Name:

 Using a critical care simulation laboratory to teach students.

Publication:

 Critical Care Nurse, 17(6), 66-68

Annotation:

 

The author, nursing faculty in a master’s program at the University of Maryland, described the use of a critical care simulation laboratory to help educate undergraduate as well as graduate students for the demands of critical care nursing. She described/discussed simulation along with the advantages and disadvantages of using simulation then followed this with detailed information on the use of a critical care simulation lab in her own school of nursing. No structured research was reported, only descriptive information was presented in this article. Supported, documented and provided rationale from literature for the use of a critical care simulation lab to enhance both undergraduate and graduate level nursing education.

Annotated By:

 Carol S. Coose, EdD, RN, CNE

Category:

 Specialties
Teaching Modalities

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Author(s):

 Nehring, W., Lashley, F

Year:

 2004

Article Name:

 Human patient simulators in nursing education: An international survey.

Publication:

 Nursing Education Perspectives, 25(5), 244-248

Annotation:

 

The authors, nursing faculty and associate dean at a university in New Jersey, reported on an international survey of nursing schools and simulation centers that collaborate with nursing schools (n = 34) who have purchased a specific brand of human patient simulator (HPS). They presented descriptive statistical information from the survey regarding the respondents’ use of HPS in several areas including: time of use in curriculum, undergraduate courses using HPS, curricular content with use of HPS, use of HPS for competency evaluation and several other informative areas such as source of money to purchase and maintain HPS. Data were sorted by whether HPS was in a university, community college, or a simulation center. Provided clear and informative data on nursing program use of one brand of HPS and a good model of further survey/study of HPS use in nursing programs.

Annotated By:

 Carol S. Coose, EdD, RN, CNE

Category:

 Curriculum Integration
Faculty Development

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Author(s):

 Nehring, W., Lashley, F. & Ellis, W.

Year:

 2002

Article Name:

 Critical incident nursing management using human patient simulators.

Publication:

 Nursing Education Perspectives, 23(3), 128-132.

Annotation:

 

The authors, nursing faculty and dean at a university in Illinois, described and presented an overview of the capabilities of human patient simulators (HPS) and how HPS can be used for competency-based instruction in nursing programs, both undergraduate and graduate. They presented details of concerns and issues of HPS use for faculty, students and administrators in nursing programs. Provided good information and guidelines for developing and using simulations with HPS. A structured research study to examine the authors’ stated beliefs about the value of HPS would have been a valuable addition to this article.

Annotated By:

 Carol S. Coose, EdD, RN, CNE

Category:

 Curriculum Integration
Faculty Development
Teaching Modalities

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Author(s):

 Neuman, L.

Year:

 2006

Article Name:

 Envisioning the evolution of e-nursing education

Publication:

 Nursing Education Perspectives, 27(1), 12-15.

Annotation:

 

The author, a nursing consultant from Maryland, discussed the rapid expansion and growth of technology and its impact on nursing education, especially in relation to the nurse educator shortage. She described and documented a variety of innovations already occurring in nursing education and presented several scenarios of nontraditional approaches to nursing education that involve increased use of technology in the delivery of education, universal access, and new paradigms for nurse educators. Some of her documentation and her ideas involve the use of simulation technology, thus the article provided challenging concepts for nurse educators and the future innovation of nursing education.

Annotated By:

 Carol S. Coose, EdD, RN, CNE

Category:

 Faculty Development
Teaching Modalities

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Author(s):

 American Educational Research Association, American Psychological Association, & National Council on Measurement in Education

Year:

 1999

Article Name:

 Standards for educational and psychological testing

Publication:

 Washington, D. C.: American Educational Research Association

Annotation:

 

This book, though over ten years old, presents the most recent “Standards†as set forth by the American Educational Research Association, American Psychological Association, and National Council on Measurement in Education. The text is reportedly being revised (http://www.apa.org/science/about/psa/2009/07/testing.aspx), but part one of the 1999 edition provides excellent overviews of validity and reliability including examples of how to assess various components of validity and reliability.

Annotated By:

 Katie Adamson, PhD, RN

Category:

 Evaluation

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Author(s):

 Cohen, E. R., Feinglass, J., Barsuk, J. H., Barnard, C., O'Donnell, A., McGaghie, W. C., & Wayne, D. B.

Year:

 2010

Article Name:

 Cost savings from reduced catheter-related bloodstream infection after simulation-based education for residents in a medical intensive care unit.

Publication:

 Simulation in Healthcare, 5(2), 98-102.

Annotation:

 

These authors provide an example of Kirkpatrick’s (1994) Level 4 evaluation using cost effectiveness as a measure of success. They demonstrated a reduction of catheter-related bloodstream infections after the implementation of a simulation-based central venous catheter insertion training program. Findings indicate a 7:1 return on investment for the program.

Annotated By:

 Katie Adamson, PhD, RN

Category:

 Evaluation

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Author(s):

 Davis, A. H., & Kimble, L. P.

Year:

 2011

Article Name:

 Human patient simulation evaluation rubrics for nursing education: Measuring the Essentials of Baccalaureate Education for Professional Nursing Practice.

Publication:

 Journal of Nursing Education, 50(11), 605-611.

Annotation:

 

This article provides a review of six instruments from the literature that were designed based on the AACN Baccalaureate Essentials. The authors include a table that synthesizes characteristics of the six instruments including: reliability and validity evidence, the learning domain the instrument is designed to evaluate (cognitive, affective, psychomotor), and which of the AACN Baccalaureate Essentials the instrument covers.

Annotated By:

 Katie Adamson, PhD, RN

Category:

 Evaluation

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Author(s):

 DeVellis, R. F.

Year:

 2003

Article Name:

 Scale development: Theory and applications.

Publication:

 Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.

Annotation:

 

This handy little volume is a great resource for anyone interested in measurement and the prospects of designing or assessing measurement instruments. The thorough, but readable sections on reliability, validity, and scale development guidelines are very practical.

The author does use the ‘old’ types of validity: content, criterion-related, and construct. So, while the concepts are useful, I recommend sticking with the ‘new’ types of validity as presented by the American Educational Research Association, American Psychological Association, and National Council on Measurement in Education (1999).

Annotated By:

 Katie Adamson, PhD, RN

Category:

 Evaluation

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Author(s):

 Draycott, T. J, Crofts, J. F., Ash, J. P.,Wilson, L. V., Yard, E., Sibanda, T. & Whitelaw, A.

Year:

 2008

Article Name:

 Improving neonatal outcome through practical shoulder dystocia training.

Publication:

 Obstetrics and Gynecology, 112(1), 14-20.

Annotation:

 

This research, based in the UK, provides an excellent example of Kirkpatrick’s (1994) Level 4 evaluation. The authors used a retrospective chart review to investigate management and associated outcomes from neonatal shoulder dystocia pre- and post- simulation-based training. The results indicated significantly improved outcomes after the implementation of simulation-based shoulder dystocia training.

Annotated By:

 Katie Adamson, PhD, RN

Category:

 Evaluation

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