Annotated Bibliography

The SIRC Bibliography offers annotations of publications related to simulation topics. These useful descriptions can help guide faculty who are looking for quality sources to investigate further. Now you can search by category as well.

Individuals are invited to submit articles/resources for inclusion by filling out this form. 


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Author(s):

 Jones, T., Cason, C. & Mancini, M.

Year:

 2002

Article Name:

 Evaluating nurse competency: Evidence of validity for a skills recredentialing program

Publication:

 Journal of Professional Nursing, 18(1), 22-28

Annotation:

 

The authors included the director of clinical research, a nursing administrator and a nursing faculty person serving as research consultant for a large hospital system in Texas. They reported on a multi-trait, multi-method approach to evaluate the validity of a hospital-based mandatory nurse competency assessment program that utilized simulated conditions as well as observations of routine care of patients to assess selected competencies of staff RNs (n = 368) at a large urban hospital. Instruments used in the study included knowledge tests, skill performance checklists, and performance ratings by nurse educators from the hospital. Validity of the knowledge test was discussed and inter-rater reliability presented for the skill performance ratings, including statistical results. There were no significant differences in ratings for the RNs between simulated and actual bedside care ratings. The authors stated that results supported the validity and reliability of the mandatory competency evaluation program and that the program identified those needing remediation. Provided clear evidence-base with statistical support for the competency evaluation program used in the study and provided a good foundation for further research on competency-based evaluation.

Annotated By:

 Carol S. Coose, EdD, RN, CNE

Category:

 Learning Outcomes
Teaching Modalities

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Author(s):

 Jonassen, D.H.

Year:

 1985

Article Name:

 Interactive lesson designs: A taxonom

Publication:

 Educational Technology, 25(6), 7-17.

Annotation:

 

The author, faculty in a school of education in the Eastern USA, presented information that supported a proposed two-dimensional taxonomy for the design and development of interactive computer learning/instruction. He presented a visual model of the taxonomy and described both dimensions of the taxonomy along with the level of interactivity and adaptations (both internal and external), in detail. The author concluded that educators need to analyze a learning problem and develop solid instructional designs before considering the ‘medium’ or technology needed to meet the instructional goals. The article provided background information and support for advance planning and development of instructional design for interactive learning using any type of technology.

Annotated By:

 Carol S. Coose, EdD, RN, CNE

Category:

 Specialties
Teaching Modalities

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Author(s):

 Jenkins, P. & Turick-Gibson, T.

Year:

 1999

Article Name:

 An exercise in critical thinking using role playing.

Publication:

 Nurse Educator, 24(6), 11-1

Annotation:

 

The authors, nursing faculty at a small private college in New York, reported on using a role-playing simulation (having diabetes mellitus for a weekend) with junior level baccalaureate nursing students (n = 34) to promote critical thinking skills and develop empathy with patients. Results were analyzed from double entry journal responses and indicated students developed and used critical thinking as defined in the article. The authors presented qualitative data to support students’ use of critical thinking and reported on positive feedback from both students and alumni regarding this simulated role-play experience. Provided positive ideas and support for using role-play to enhance learning through simulation plus gave specific ways and methods to evaluate students’ use of critical thinking. This article provided a good start for further research on role-play simulations as well as the evaluation of critical thinking.

Annotated By:

 Carol S. Coose, EdD, RN, CNE

Category:

 Teaching Modalities

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Author(s):

 Jeffries, P.R. (invited guest editor).

Year:

 2006

Article Name:

 Developing evidenced-based teaching strategies and practices when using simulation.

Publication:

 INACSL Online Journal, INACSL.

Annotation:

 

The author, a prominent nurse educator and published author in nursing education, defined evidence-based teaching and discussed how nursing faculty are contributing and can continue to develop evidence-based teaching practices when incorporating simulation into nursing education. She described and presented several completed studies that have developed valid and reliable quantitative measures of specific areas such as student satisfaction as well as providing guides and listing key factors to be considered when developing simulations. She suggested the need for more rigorous research of the use of simulation in nursing education and reported that simulation technology is ‘revolutionizing’ nursing education. Provided very thought provoking as well as useful information for nurse educators

Annotated By:

 Carol S. Coose, EdD, RN, CNE

Category:

 Learning Outcomes
Faculty Development

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Author(s):

 Jeffries, P.R.

Year:

 2005

Article Name:

 Designing simulations for nursing education. In M. Oermann & K. Heinrich (Eds.).

Publication:

  Annual Review of Nursing Education, Vol. 4. New York: New York, Springer Publishing Company, Inc.

Annotation:

 

The author, a much published and recognized expert in nursing education and simulation, presented a framework for guiding the process of designing, implementing and evaluating simulations for use in nursing education. She provided clear documentation from literature for each step in the development/ construction of simulations and presented two reliable and valid instruments designed for use in evaluating simulation outcomes (Educational Practices in Simulation Scale or EPSS and Simulation Design Scale or SDS). This chapter provided detailed and supported guidelines and directions for developing and implementing simulations into nursing education as well as evaluating outcomes and adding to the evidence re: use of simulation. She supported the need for more rigorous research of simulation outcomes in nursing education.

Annotated By:

 Carol S. Coose, EdD, RN, CNE

Category:

 Learning Outcomes
Faculty Development
Teaching Modalities

More

Author(s):

 Jeffries, P.R.

Year:

 2005

Article Name:

 Designing simulations for nursing education. In M. Oermann & K. Heinrich (Eds.).

Publication:

 Annual Review of Nursing Education, Vol. 4. New York: New York, Springer Publishing Company, Inc.

Annotation:

 

The author, a much published and recognized expert in nursing education and simulation, presented a framework for guiding the process of designing, implementing and evaluating simulations for use in nursing education. She provided clear documentation from literature for each step in the development/ construction of simulations and presented two reliable and valid instruments designed for use in evaluating simulation outcomes (Educational Practices in Simulation Scale or EPSS and Simulation Design Scale or SDS). This chapter provided detailed and supported guidelines and directions for developing and implementing simulations into nursing education as well as evaluating outcomes and adding to the evidence re: use of simulation. She supported the need for more rigorous research of simulation outcomes in nursing education.

Annotated By:

 Carol S. Coose, EdD, RN, CNE

Category:

 Learning Outcomes
Faculty Development
Teaching Modalities

More

Author(s):

 Lasater, K.

Year:

 2007

Article Name:

 High-fidelity simulation and the development of clinical judgment: Students’ experiences

Publication:

 Journal of Nursing Education, 46(6), 269-276.

Annotation:

 

The author, nursing faculty at a major school of nursing in Oregon, reported on a qualitative study that examined junior level baccalaureate nursing students’ first time experiences with use of high fidelity simulation as part of a course in care of the acutely ill adult in a regular curriculum. Findings from the limited focus group (n = 15) used for the study yielded 5 main codes of student responses regarding the use of high fidelity simulation for enhancing clinical judgment. The author discussed each of these codes in some detail, and discussed the limitations and lessons learned from the study, along with implications for further research. Presented interesting and thought-provoking information about the use of simulation in developing nursing clinical judgment and provided a good starting point for additional research on use of high-fidelity simulation in developing clinical judgment of nursing students.

Annotated By:

 Carol S. Coose, EdD, RN, CNE

Category:

 Learning Outcomes
Faculty Development
Teaching Modalities

More

Author(s):

 Lee, C. & Lamp, J.

Year:

 2003

Article Name:

 The use of humor and role-playing in reinforcing key concepts

Publication:

 Nurse Educator, 28(2), 61-62

Annotation:

 

The authors, nursing faculty at a college in Ohio, described a role-played simulation utilized in an obstetric nursing class that involved faculty as the ‘patients’ and students as the nurses. They reported that this strategy received consistently positive feedback from students and that it also served as a summary/review of main concepts or content and ‘lightens the atmosphere’ of the class. Provided detailed information that could be utilized for low-tech, easily developed and humorous classroom simulations, especially for obstetric nursing

Annotated By:

 Carol S. Coose, EdD, RN, CNE

Category:

 Teaching Modalities

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Author(s):

 McGuire, C.

Year:

 1976

Article Name:

 Simulation technique in the teaching and testing of problem-solving skills

Publication:

 Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 13(2), 89-100.

Annotation:

 

The author, faculty in a College of Medicine at a large Midwestern university, presented and discussed the use of a variety of simulation modalities in the instruction of medical students, residents, and medical clinicians. The author reported that at the time the article was written (1976) simulation technology had only been employed in limited areas of professional education. The article presented details on varying alternative simulation techniques for use in medical education or evaluation of learning and skills in medicine. This article provided a very good background on simulation models, modalities and specific uses of simulation as well as some advantages and limitations of simulation. The determination of validity on certain simulations was discussed and statistics presented. The author concluded that the evidence from studies of the use of simulation at several levels of medical education, with a variety of types of groups, suggested that when done properly, simulation exercises gave considerable promise of becoming a powerful tool for instruction and assessment of problem-solving skills.

Annotated By:

 Carol S. Coose, EdD, RN, CNE

Category:

 Learning Outcomes
Faculty Development
Teaching Modalities

More

Author(s):

 Medley, C. & Horne, C.

Year:

 2005

Article Name:

 Using simulation technology for undergraduate nursing education.

Publication:

 Journal of Nursing Education, 44(1), 31-4.

Annotation:

 

The authors, nursing faculty and retired nursing faculty at a Florida university, reported on the process of using simulation technology for instruction and provided examples and ideas for leveling simulation programs for use in the undergraduate nursing program. The authors emphasized the need for rigorous research into the validity and reliability of simulation use in nursing education and in particular the need for comparative studies to confirm the ‘added value’ of simulation beyond traditional teaching techniques. Issues related to faculty development and cost of simulation use, were discussed in the article. Provided some good information and some of the challenges for nurse educators related to simulation.

Annotated By:

 

Category:

 Faculty Development

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