Annotated Bibliography

The SIRC Bibliography offers annotations of publications related to simulation topics. These useful descriptions can help guide faculty who are looking for quality sources to investigate further. Now you can search by category as well.

Individuals are invited to submit articles/resources for inclusion by filling out this form. 


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Author(s):

 Jeffries, P.R. (invited guest editor).

Year:

 2006

Article Name:

 Developing evidenced-based teaching strategies and practices when using simulation.

Publication:

 INACSL Online Journal, INACSL.

Annotation:

 

The author, a prominent nurse educator and published author in nursing education, defined evidence-based teaching and discussed how nursing faculty are contributing and can continue to develop evidence-based teaching practices when incorporating simulation into nursing education. She described and presented several completed studies that have developed valid and reliable quantitative measures of specific areas such as student satisfaction as well as providing guides and listing key factors to be considered when developing simulations. She suggested the need for more rigorous research of the use of simulation in nursing education and reported that simulation technology is ‘revolutionizing’ nursing education. Provided very thought provoking as well as useful information for nurse educators

Annotated By:

 Carol S. Coose, EdD, RN, CNE

Category:

 Learning Outcomes
Faculty Development

More

Author(s):

 Jenkins, P. & Turick-Gibson, T.

Year:

 1999

Article Name:

 An exercise in critical thinking using role playing.

Publication:

 Nurse Educator, 24(6), 11-1

Annotation:

 

The authors, nursing faculty at a small private college in New York, reported on using a role-playing simulation (having diabetes mellitus for a weekend) with junior level baccalaureate nursing students (n = 34) to promote critical thinking skills and develop empathy with patients. Results were analyzed from double entry journal responses and indicated students developed and used critical thinking as defined in the article. The authors presented qualitative data to support students’ use of critical thinking and reported on positive feedback from both students and alumni regarding this simulated role-play experience. Provided positive ideas and support for using role-play to enhance learning through simulation plus gave specific ways and methods to evaluate students’ use of critical thinking. This article provided a good start for further research on role-play simulations as well as the evaluation of critical thinking.

Annotated By:

 Carol S. Coose, EdD, RN, CNE

Category:

 Teaching Modalities

More

Author(s):

 Johnson, J., Zerwic, J., & Theis, S.

Year:

 1999

Article Name:

 Clinical simulation laboratory: An adjunct to clinical teaching.

Publication:

 Nurse Educator, 24(5), 37-41.

Annotation:

 

The authors, nursing faculty at a Midwestern university, discussed the structure, implementation and evaluation of videotaped clinical simulations and telephone simulations that involved role-playing by senior level students (n=51) during their last clinical nursing course. The authors reported that no new content was taught in the nursing course and that they used an evaluation tool with students following the clinical simulation experiences. They presented descriptive statistics of student responses on the evaluation instrument. Student responses were reported as highly positive and the authors reported that the simulation experiences had become a regular part of the last clinical nursing course. Provided support for videotaping student role-play of clinical simulations and for use of phone simulations. The authors did not discuss the limitations of the study or validity/reliability of the evaluation instrument, which would have been a valuable addition to the article.

Annotated By:

 Carol S. Coose, EdD, RN, CNE

Category:

 Teaching Modalities

More

Author(s):

 Jonassen, D.H.

Year:

 1985

Article Name:

 Interactive lesson designs: A taxonom

Publication:

 Educational Technology, 25(6), 7-17.

Annotation:

 

The author, faculty in a school of education in the Eastern USA, presented information that supported a proposed two-dimensional taxonomy for the design and development of interactive computer learning/instruction. He presented a visual model of the taxonomy and described both dimensions of the taxonomy along with the level of interactivity and adaptations (both internal and external), in detail. The author concluded that educators need to analyze a learning problem and develop solid instructional designs before considering the ‘medium’ or technology needed to meet the instructional goals. The article provided background information and support for advance planning and development of instructional design for interactive learning using any type of technology.

Annotated By:

 Carol S. Coose, EdD, RN, CNE

Category:

 Teaching Modalities

More

Author(s):

 Jones, T., Cason, C. & Mancini, M.

Year:

 2002

Article Name:

 Evaluating nurse competency: Evidence of validity for a skills recredentialing program

Publication:

 Journal of Professional Nursing, 18(1), 22-28

Annotation:

 

The authors included the director of clinical research, a nursing administrator and a nursing faculty person serving as research consultant for a large hospital system in Texas. They reported on a multi-trait, multi-method approach to evaluate the validity of a hospital-based mandatory nurse competency assessment program that utilized simulated conditions as well as observations of routine care of patients to assess selected competencies of staff RNs (n = 368) at a large urban hospital. Instruments used in the study included knowledge tests, skill performance checklists, and performance ratings by nurse educators from the hospital. Validity of the knowledge test was discussed and inter-rater reliability presented for the skill performance ratings, including statistical results. There were no significant differences in ratings for the RNs between simulated and actual bedside care ratings. The authors stated that results supported the validity and reliability of the mandatory competency evaluation program and that the program identified those needing remediation. Provided clear evidence-base with statistical support for the competency evaluation program used in the study and provided a good foundation for further research on competency-based evaluation.

Annotated By:

 Carol S. Coose, EdD, RN, CNE

Category:

 Learning Outcomes
Teaching Modalities

More

Author(s):

 Kardong-Edgren, s., Anderson, M., & Michaels, J.

Year:

 2007

Article Name:

 Does simulation fidelity improve student test scores?

Publication:

 INACSL Online Journal, 3(1), 8 p.

Annotation:

 

The authors, nursing faculty at a large Texas university, reported on a pre-test post-test pilot study conducted with pre-nursing students (n = 14) comparing 3 groups: lecture only, low fidelity simulation, and high fidelity simulation to teach basic nursing information on congestive heart failure. They described the methodology of the study, the content validity of the exam used and presented statistical analysis of the score comparisons between the three groups. Results indicated no significant differences in pre or post -test scores between the groups. The authors discussed the limitations of this study and the need for a larger study as well as discussing the changing characteristics of today’s nursing students. Provided an excellent model for further/continuing comparison study of learning outcomes using simulation.

Annotated By:

 Carol S. Coose, EdD, RN, CNE

Category:

 Learning Outcomes
Faculty Development
Teaching Modalities

More

Author(s):

 Kneebone, R., Scott, W., Darzi, A., & Horrocks, M.

Year:

 2004

Article Name:

 Simuation and clinical practice: Strengthening the relationship

Publication:

 Medical Education, 38, 1095-1102

Annotation:

 

The authors, two medical and one education faculty from a college and a university in the United Kingdom, presented a discussion paper arguing for a more creative synthesis between clinical practice and simulation. They discussed, with supportive documentation, the following: expertise in performing invasive clinical procedures requires sustained and deliberate practice; simulation offers learner-centered education without some of the safety issues/pressures of clinical practice; there is a danger of simulator training becoming too separated from reality of patient care. The authors presented a theory-based conceptual framework for creating and maintaining close links between task-based practice (simulators) and the real clinical setting. They proposed that simulator-based resources should be available alongside the clinical workplace, so that learning takes place more in context with reality, in other words, a more integrated training/education for complex psychomotor skills in particular. This would allow learners to move smoothly from bedside to skills lab and back again, while harmonizing the learning techniques. This article had some possible implications for nursing education as much of the documentation presented could readily transfer across disciplines into nursing skills. Provided support for integrating skills simulation practice with clinical experiences.

Annotated By:

 Carol S. Coose, EdD, RN, CNE

Category:

 Faculty Development
Teaching Modalities

More

Author(s):

 Larew, C., Lessons, S., Spunt, D., Foster, D., & Covington, B.

Year:

 2006

Article Name:

 Innovations in clinical simulation: Application of Benner’s theory in an interactive patient care simulation.

Publication:

 Nursing Education Perspectives, 27(1), 16-21.

Annotation:

 

The authors included a nursing doctoral student and a nursing doctoral candidate (also graduate teaching assistants), the director, and a coordinator of the clinical simulations laboratory at a school of nursing, plus an associate dean, all from a Maryland university. These authors introduced a clinical simulation protocol structure that they used to provide a mandatory, non-graded simulation learning experience with 190 junior and senior level baccalaureate nursing students in adult health courses. They discussed the lessons learned in developing and implementing the simulation protocol as well as the challenges and limitations of the protocol. The authors stated the need to develop valid and reliable methods for evaluation of students to allow the simulation protocol to be utilized for clinical competency evaluation. No statistics were presented, mostly a descriptive article that supported use of simulation to enhance learning and the need for further research regarding simulation use in nursing education.

Annotated By:

 Carol S. Coose, EdD, RN, CNE

Category:

 Curriculum Integration
Teaching Modalities

More

Author(s):

 Kneebone, R., Scott, W., Darzi, A., & Horrocks, M.

Year:

 2004

Article Name:

 Simuation and clinical practice: Strengthening the relationship

Publication:

 Medical Education, 38, 1095-1102

Annotation:

 

The authors, two medical and one education faculty from a college and a university in the United Kingdom, presented a discussion paper arguing for a more creative synthesis between clinical practice and simulation. They discussed, with supportive documentation, the following: expertise in performing invasive clinical procedures requires sustained and deliberate practice; simulation offers learner-centered education without some of the safety issues/pressures of clinical practice; there is a danger of simulator training becoming too separated from reality of patient care. The authors presented a theory-based conceptual framework for creating and maintaining close links between task-based practice (simulators) and the real clinical setting. They proposed that simulator-based resources should be available alongside the clinical workplace, so that learning takes place more in context with reality, in other words, a more integrated training/education for complex psychomotor skills in particular. This would allow learners to move smoothly from bedside to skills lab and back again, while harmonizing the learning techniques. This article had some possible implications for nursing education as much of the documentation presented could readily transfer across disciplines into nursing skills. Provided support for integrating skills simulation practice with clinical experiences.

Annotated By:

 Carol S. Coose, EdD, RN, CNE

Category:

 Faculty Development
Teaching Modalities

More

Author(s):

 Kardong-Edgren, s., Anderson, M., & Michaels, J.

Year:

 2007

Article Name:

 Does simulation fidelity improve student test scores?

Publication:

 INACSL Online Journal, 3(1), 8 p.

Annotation:

 

The authors, nursing faculty at a large Texas university, reported on a pre-test post-test pilot study conducted with pre-nursing students (n = 14) comparing 3 groups: lecture only, low fidelity simulation, and high fidelity simulation to teach basic nursing information on congestive heart failure. They described the methodology of the study, the content validity of the exam used and presented statistical analysis of the score comparisons between the three groups. Results indicated no significant differences in pre or post -test scores between the groups. The authors discussed the limitations of this study and the need for a larger study as well as discussing the changing characteristics of today’s nursing students. Provided an excellent model for further/continuing comparison study of learning outcomes using simulation.

Annotated By:

 Carol S. Coose, EdD, RN, CNE

Category:

 Learning Outcomes
Faculty Development
Teaching Modalities

More

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