Annotated Bibliography

The SIRC Bibliography offers annotations of publications related to simulation topics. These useful descriptions can help guide faculty who are looking for quality sources to investigate further. Now you can search by category as well.

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Author(s):

 Childs, J., & Sepples, S.

Year:

 2006

Article Name:

 Clinical teaching by simulation: Lessons learned from a complex patient care scenario.

Publication:

 Nursing Education Perspectives, 27(3), 154-158.

Annotation:

 

The authors, baccalaureate nursing faculty at a university in Maine, reported on lessons they learned in developing and implementing a simulated learning experience with senior level baccalaureate nursing students (n=55) in providing care for patients with cardiac dysfunction. This study was designed to measure student satisfaction with four simulation scenarios which had progressive complexity, as well as to test the reliability and validity of two instruments developed for the NLN/Laerdal national study of human patient simulator (HPS) use in nursing education (the Simulation Design Scale [SDS] and Educational Practices in Simulation Scale [EPSS]). This study also utilized two questionnaires specific to the university. Results indicated the two instruments (SDS and EPSS) were reliable and valid and that students rated their experiences with simulation overwhelmingly positive. No statistics were presented, but the reader was referred to the summary results of the NLN/Laerdal national study of HPS use for reliability and validity statistics for the two instruments piloted (see Jeffries & Rizzolo, 2006). The authors reported that students viewed feedback and objectives/information as the most important simulation features, and feedback as the most important educational practice of the simulation experiences. Statistical data would have been a valuable addition to this article. Very specific information (lessons learned) was provided for potential users of HPS regarding the development of simulation scenarios and implementation of HPS and other simulations in nursing education.

Annotated By:

 Carol S. Coose, EdD, RN, CNE

Category:

 Learning Outcomes
Specialties
Teaching Modalities

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Author(s):

 Cioffi, J.

Year:

 2001

Article Name:

 Clinical simulations: Development and validation.

Publication:

 

Annotation:

 

The author, nursing and health care faculty for a university in Australia, presented a conceptual approach to simulation development and validation as applied to developing assessment simulations in two nursing situations (childbirth and triage). The author discussed/described the determination of content and construct validity of the simulations developed, as well as explained that reliability testing was not feasible with case simulations. She then presented the steps for developing case simulations, testing for validity and modifying the simulations to assure validity. She reported that the simulations thus developed had been used successfully with less experienced clinicians to develop their assessment skills and reported positive anecdotal feedback from participants. The author concluded that simulations can be used to prepare students as well as clinicians needing to learn an unfamiliar practice area. Provided some documented and detailed information on developing and validating case-study scenarios for use in enhancing nursing education.

Annotated By:

 Carol S. Coose, EdD, RN, CNE

Category:

 Specialties
Teaching Modalities

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Author(s):

 Comer, S.K.

Year:

 2005

Article Name:

 Patient care simulations: Role-playing to enhance clinical understanding.

Publication:

 Nursing Education Perspectives, 26 (6), 357-361.

Annotation:

 

The author, nursing faculty in an associate degree nursing (ADN) program at a university in Indiana, reported on the use of clinical simulations that involved role-playing of simulated nursing care in a critical-care nursing course for second year associate degree nursing students. The author presented details of one clinical scenario and reported positive responses by students (n=30) to the use of the role-playing simulations as well as a decrease in the failure rate on the corresponding course exam. Minimal descriptive statistics were reported and the author reported the use of an informal questionnaire. Details of the questionnaire and further statistical analysis would have been a valuable addition to this article.

Annotated By:

 Carol S. Coose, EdD, RN, CNE

Category:

 Learning Outcomes
Specialties
Teaching Modalities

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Author(s):

 Corcoran, S.

Year:

 1986

Article Name:

 Task complexity and nursing expertise as factors in decision-making.

Publication:

 Nursing Research, 35(2), 107-112.

Annotation:

 

The author, nursing faculty for a university in Minnesota, reported on a study that used an information-processing and verbal protocol methodology to describe the approaches to planning utilized by six expert and five novice hospice nurses who were paid volunteers for the study. The purpose of the study was to describe the approaches to planning used by nurses and to explore the relationship between the overall approaches used by case complexity and the resulting quality of the plan. She presented details of the methodology, design, implementation and analysis of the study. Results are presented with statistics regarding differences in approaches to planning for the expert nurse (initial broad approach) as compared to the novice nurse (used narrow initial approach more frequently). She discussed other differences noted between expert and novice nurses supported by statistics and provided some examples. Results indicated that task complexity did not influence initial planning strategies of either the expert or novice nurses. This article provided clear documented research in the use of case scenarios to explore nurses information-processing and approaches to planning care.

Annotated By:

 

Category:

 Specialties
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Author(s):

 Curran, V.R., Aziz, K., O'Young, S. & Bessell, C.

Year:

 2004

Article Name:

 Evaluation of the effect of a computerized training simulator (ANAKIN) on the retention of neonatal resuscitation skills.

Publication:

 Teaching and Learning in Medicine, 16(2), 157-164.

Annotation:

 

The authors were faculty in medicine, engineering, and nursing education at a university in Newfoundland, Canada. They reported on a randomized pretest-posttest control group study updating neonatal resuscitation skills (NRP) four months after initial training. The study was done with third-year undergraduate medical students (n=60) and involved an experimental group which was updated using a specific computerized manikin simulator with sensors to monitor effectiveness of resuscitation, clinical signs controlled remotely by an instructor, as well as two way audio-video communication with faculty. The control group was updated using instructional video. The main purpose was to evaluate the effectiveness of the specific neonatal simulator system as a means for updating and assessing neonatal resuscitation skills. The authors reported there were no significant differences between the experimental and control groups on any of the measures used, including measures of performance, knowledge, confidence, and satisfaction with neonatal resuscitation skills. Statistical data were presented including reliability results on the instruments used for measuring performance and confidence. The authors also reported positive responses from students to their experiences with the simulator system and concluded that the simulator was at least as good as the video instruction in updating resuscitation skills. Limitations and delimitations of the study were discussed as well as the possible benefits of the simulator system for facilitating remote NRP skills training and assessment.

Annotated By:

 Carol S. Coose, EdD, RN, CNE

Category:

 Interprofessional
Learning Outcomes
Specialties
Teaching Modalities

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Author(s):

 Issenberg, McGaghie, Petrusa, Gordon, & Scalese

Year:

 2005

Article Name:

 Features and uses of high-fidelity medical simulations that lead to effective learning: a BEME systematic review.

Publication:

 Med Teach. 2005 Jan;27(1):10-28.

Annotation:

 

This systematic review of simulation in medical education and medical personnel evaluation covers articles presented over a 34 year time period from 1969-2003. Four screening criteria was used: empirical studies; use of simulators for educational assessment or learning outcomes; comparative research; and research that used simulation as an educational intervention. a total of 109 eligible articles were reviewed. Findings from the review indicated that high fidelity medical simulation was educationally effective and complemented medical education.

Annotated By:

 Rebecca H. Newton, DNP, RN

Category:

 Review Articles
Learning Outcomes
Teaching Modalities

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Author(s):

 Weaver, Amy

Year:

 2011

Article Name:

 High-Fidelity Patient Simulation in Nursing Education: An Integrative Review

Publication:

 Nursing Education Perspectives, 23(1), 37-40.

Annotation:

 

Weaver, a nursing faculty and doctoral candidate, conducted an integrated review and analyzed studies published since 1998 to April 2008 on the use of high-fidelity patient simulation (HFPS) in nursing undergraduate schools. Initially screening for concepts of knowledge and confidence, the author identified the following recurrent concepts of: values, realism, stress, learner satisfaction and knowledge transfer. The review supported the benefits of HFPS for nursing students related to knowledge, value, realism, and learner satisfaction. Weaver reported mixed results in areas of student confidence, knowledge transfer, and stress. Further research is recommended in these and other areas, which would support the cost and effectiveness of HFPS.

Annotated By:

 Rosalinda DeLuna, RN, MSN, CCRN

Category:

 Review Articles

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Author(s):

 Ross, Jennifer Gunberg

Year:

 2011

Article Name:

 Simulation and Psychomotor Skill Acquisition: A Review of Literature

Publication:

 Clinical Simulation in Nursing

Annotation:

 

Ross, faculty at the College of Nursing at Villanova University, conducted a systematic review on the efficacy of simulation for psychomotor skill acquisition in allied health. She examined studies from January 2008 to January 2011 and concluded that there is a dearth of research on this topic. The quantitative research did support using simulations for psychomotor skills. Most of the studies conducted were in medical education using high-fidelity simulations. The author recommended areas for future studies such as: using low-fidelity simulation for psychomotor skills, inclusion of more varied psychomotor skills, and more quantitative evaluation of simulation as a teaching methodology for psychomotor skills for nursing education.

Annotated By:

 Rosalinda DeLuna, RN, MSN, CCRN

Category:

 Review Articles

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Author(s):

 Jeffries, P.R.

Year:

 2005

Article Name:

 Technology trends in nursing education: Next steps. Guest editorial.

Publication:

 Publication: Journal of Nursing Education. 44(1), 3-4. (Invited editorial).

Annotation:

 

The author, a published and recognized leader in nursing education, presented and supported her views regarding the future of technology in nursing education. Part of her editorial addressed the use of simulation in nursing education as well as the need for rigorous research to evaluate learning outcomes of simulation use. Provided a good overall view of several issues facing nursing education.

Annotated By:

 Carol S. Coose, EdD, RN, CNE

Category:

 Learning Outcomes
Teaching Modalities

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Author(s):

 Jeffries, P.R.

Year:

 2005

Article Name:

 Designing simulations for nursing education. In M. Oermann & K. Heinrich (Eds.).

Publication:

 Annual Review of Nursing Education, Vol. 4. New York: New York, Springer Publishing Company, Inc.

Annotation:

 

The author, a much published and recognized expert in nursing education and simulation, presented a framework for guiding the process of designing, implementing and evaluating simulations for use in nursing education. She provided clear documentation from literature for each step in the development/ construction of simulations and presented two reliable and valid instruments designed for use in evaluating simulation outcomes (Educational Practices in Simulation Scale or EPSS and Simulation Design Scale or SDS). This chapter provided detailed and supported guidelines and directions for developing and implementing simulations into nursing education as well as evaluating outcomes and adding to the evidence re: use of simulation. She supported the need for more rigorous research of simulation outcomes in nursing education.

Annotated By:

 Carol S. Coose, EdD, RN, CNE

Category:

 Learning Outcomes
Faculty Development
Teaching Modalities

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