Annotated Bibliography

The SIRC Bibliography offers annotations of publications related to simulation topics. These useful descriptions can help guide faculty who are looking for quality sources to investigate further. Now you can search by category as well.

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Author(s):

 Reigeluth, C.M. & Schwartz, E.

Year:

 1989

Article Name:

 An instructional theory for the design of computer-based simulations.

Publication:

 Journal of Computer-Based Instruction, 16(1), 1-10.

Annotation:

 

The authors, instructional technology faculty at a large Eastern university, described the design of computer-based simulations in terms of three major aspects: the scenario, the underlying model and the instructional overlay, with major emphasis/focus on the instructional overly. They presented a feature-function map of a general model for simulation development and discussed each aspect of their proposed model. They also discussed/presented variations on the general model for specific types of content as well as proposing prescriptions for the nature of stimulus and response for practice cases with several types of simulations. The authors stated that their theory was designed to provide a useful framework for conceptualizing research studies and the theory needed further research/revision. A structured, validated research study with some statistical data would have been a valuable addition to this theoretical article. Provided theory background for the development of computer based simulations.

Annotated By:

 Carol S. Coose, EdD, RN, CNE

Category:

 Curriculum Integration
Teaching Modalities

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Author(s):

 Rhodes, M.L. & Curran, C.

Year:

 2005

Article Name:

 Use of the human patient simulator to teach clinical judgment skills in a baccalaureate nursing program.

Publication:

 Computers, Informatics, Nursing, 23(5), 256-62.

Annotation:

 

The authors, nursing faculty at a New York university, provided a description of their use of a human patient simulator (HPS) in teaching clinical judgment skills to senior level nursing students (n = 21). The article is mainly descriptive with some anecdotal results from a survey of student perceptions of the simulation experience. The authors reported that overall the students were positive about the learning experience, including the realism of the scenario, and would recommend continuing use of the HPS simulation. A structured research with resulting statistical data would have been a valuable addition to this article. Provided descriptive information and supported the use of HPS for enhancing clinical judgment skills in nursing education.

Annotated By:

 Carol S. Coose, EdD, RN, CNE

Category:

 Learning Outcomes

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Author(s):

 Rizzolo, M.A.

Year:

 1994

Article Name:

 Multimedia patient case study simulations: Considerations for their evaluation and use.

Publication:

 In S.J. Grobe and E.S. Pluyer-Wenting (Eds.) Nursing informatics: An international overview for nursing in a technological era (pp. 553-557). The Netherlands: Elsevier.

Annotation:

 

The author, director of interactive technologies for the American Journal of Nursing Company, discussed the evaluation of fidelity in multi-media case study simulations along with a variety of ways to use these simulations. She presented details on the five aspects of multimedia case study programs: realism, level of decision-making, user input, feedback and record keeping, and balance of video, text and graphics followed by specific documented guidelines/suggestions on the use and integration of these simulations into nursing education. The conclusion of this article provided a prediction of the future for multi media case study simulations that has now become reality in the high fidelity human patient simulators. Provided excellent information on evaluation and use of simulation in nursing education.

Annotated By:

 Carol S. Coose, EdD, RN, CNE

Category:

 Faculty Development

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Author(s):

 Roberts, J. D., While, A. & Fitzpatrick, J.M.

Year:

 1992

Article Name:

 Simulation: Current status in nurse education.

Publication:

 Nurse Education Today, 12, 409-415.

Annotation:

 

The authors, nursing faculty and a research assistant at King’ College in London, presented a paper that explored the current status of simulation use in nursing education about 15 years ago (1992). They reported an extensive review of literature and research at the time of their writing, which included information on a variety of simulation methods and studies many of which involved case studies or case scenarios and evaluation tools for student performance. They concluded that although further research was clearly needed, simulation had a strong potential and a valuable role to play in nursing education, not just in psychomotor skill development but also in developing what they called ‘integrative skills’ needed for clinical practice. This provided a good foundational review of early literature/research on simulations.

Annotated By:

 Carol S. Coose, EdD, RN, CNE

Category:

 Review Articles
Interprofessional

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Author(s):

 Rodehorst, T.K., Wilhelm, S.L. & Jensen, L.

Year:

 2005

Article Name:

 Use of interdisciplinary simulation to understand perceptions of team member roles.

Publication:

 Journal of Professional Nursing, 21(3), 159-166.

Annotation:

 

The authors, nursing faculty at a Nebraska university, presented an interpretive analysis of a qualitative study of student perceptions regarding the usefulness of interdisciplinary learning about care of asthma patients using CD-ROM simulations. The study was conducted with health care practitioner students (n = 26) from four different disciplines (nursing, medicine, pharmacy and respiratory therapy). Descriptive demographic statistics were presented and methods to establish trustworthiness and dependability of the data collected were described. The data analysis indicated the data could readily be categorized into four major themes that represented the social systems element of the theoretical framework presented for the study. The authors presented examples of how the data collected from focus group interviews fit into each of the four themes: similarities/differences, norms/values/cultures, professional orientation, and hierarchy. The authors concluded that the interdisciplinary approach used with the simulation on the CD can enrich students and health-team members learning as well as their collaboration. They also discussed study limitations plus the need for more research. Provided a solid example of a qualitative study regarding the use of an interdisciplinary approach that involved use of a simulation even though it was not really a study related to the value, development or effectiveness of simulation use.

Annotated By:

 Carol S. Coose, EdD, RN, CNE

Category:

 Interprofessional
Teaching Modalities

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Author(s):

 Rogers, K., & Schwab-Kapty, S.

Year:

 2006

Article Name:

 Ask the nurse expert: Simulation advice.

Publication:

 INACSL Online Journal, 2(1).

Annotation:

 

The authors, nursing faculty at a university in Pennsylvania, responded to four questions posed by the guest editor regarding their use of simulation in nursing education. These experts reported what they viewed as strengths of simulation use; provided some simple, detailed but creative ways to make simulation more realistic; listed increased knowledge and confidence as the outcomes of simulation experiences; and listed active involvement of faculty in simulation development and implementation as a method for increasing faculty knowledge and use of simulation in nursing education. Provided some good, simple, realistic and detailed ideas for use in nursing simulations.

Annotated By:

 Carol S. Coose, EdD, RN, CNE

Category:

 Faculty Development

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Author(s):

 Scherer, Y., Bruce, S., & Runkawatt, V.

Year:

 2007

Article Name:

 A comparison of clinical simulation and case study presentation on nurse practitioner students’ knowledge and confidence in managing a cardiac event.

Publication:

 International Journal of Nursing Education Scholarship, 4(1), 1-14.

Annotation:

 

The authors, nursing faculty at the University of Buffalo, reported on a quasi experimental pilot study designed to compare the efficacy of using a simulation mannequin (SM) (n = 13) versus a case study presentation (control n = 10) on the knowledge and confidence of acute-care nurse practitioner (NP) students (N = 23) regarding the management of a cardiac event. The study utilized pre-test/post-test for knowledge and confidence with both groups. Results showed no significant difference in knowledge test scores between the experimental (SM) and control (case-study) groups. However, the control group scored significantly higher in posttest confidence. Details of the study, along with statistics are presented and discussed as well as the limitations and needs for further research. Provided a good pilot study for the comparison of the use of high fidelity human patient simulators to the use of the same scenario as a case study presentation/discussion utilizing similar objectives for each group. The authors stated that testing of instruments needed to be addressed and this would have been a valuable addition to the article.

Annotated By:

 Carol S. Coose, EdD, RN, CNE

Category:

 Learning Outcomes

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Author(s):

 Seropian M.A., Brown, K., Gavilanes, J.S. & Driggers, B.

Year:

 2004

Article Name:

 An approach to simulation program development.

Publication:

 Journal of Nursing Education, 43(4), 170-174.

Annotation:

 

The authors, medical and nursing faculty, as well as simulation specialists at Oregon Health Sciences University, presented a detailed description, approach to and timeline for the development of a simulation program/facility for use in health care education. The authors cover everything from the vision for the program, to the business plan, buy-in, facility construction, equipment purchase, through training, curriculum and faculty development, and infrastructure issues. Provided a clear, practical and realistic description of the issues and needs for the development of a simulation program for health care education, including cost and faculty development issues. This was a valuable article for nursing education faculty and administrators interested or desiring to incorporate simulation into nursing programs.

Annotated By:

 Carol S. Coose, EdD, RN, CNE

Category:

 Faculty Development

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Author(s):

 Shearer, R. & Davidhizar, R.

Year:

 2003

Article Name:

 Using role play to develop cultural competence.

Publication:

 Journal of Nursing Education, 42(6), 273-276.

Annotation:

  The authors, a dean and faculty member at a Midwestern university, reported on their technique using role play to teach/enhance the cultural competence of nursing students. They described detailed strategies for implementing role-play successfully with nursing students and provided documentation from the literature to support their methods/strategies. A sample role-play scenario is provided for the readers. The authors concluded that role-play is a valuable teaching strategy for nursing students when used with adequate pre-planning to achieve learning objectives. The article is descriptive and anecdotal. A more structured study, perhaps a student survey, would have been valuable addition to this article.

Annotated By:

 Carol S. Coose, EdD, RN, CNE

Category:

 Teaching Modalities

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Author(s):

 Seropian M.A., Brown, K., Gavilanes, J.S. & Driggers, B.

Year:

 2004

Article Name:

 Simulation: Not just a manikin.

Publication:

 Journal of Nursing Education, 43(4), 164-169.

Annotation:

  The authors, medical and nursing faculty, as well as simulation specialists at Oregon Health Sciences University, introduce and clarify the different types of simulation equipment available for health care education as well as describing the roles and limitations of the technologies. Simulation fidelity is described along with the various levels of simulators: low fidelity, moderate fidelity and high fidelity. Advantages and disadvantages of computer-based simulation programs are discussed along with other categories of simulation such as task and skill trainers versus full-scale simulation. The article provided valuable knowledge and information regarding simulation equipment, its uses and limitations.

Annotated By:

 Carol S. Coose, EdD, RN, CNE

Category:

 Faculty Development

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